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China’s Maritime Silk Road

Advancing Global Development?

Gerald Chan

This innovative book examines the maritime component of China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), focusing on three key trade routes and addressing the question of how China protects its overseas assets. Gerald Chan explores China’s rising maritime power, using geo-developmentalism as a theoretical framework to analyse the country’s development of port facilities and infrastructure along important trade routes. Through developing these sea routes, he argues that a new global order is in the making.
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Gerald Chan

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Nengye Liu

Henry Kissinger, in his book World Order, describes order as: “The concept held by a region or civilization about the nature of just arrangements and the distribution of power thought to be applicable to the entire world” (Kissinger, 2015: 9). The United States of America, together with its Western allies, constructed the existing rules-based order that has governed the world since the Second World War. International law is at the core of the rules-based international order (Scott, 2017). However, who determines the law-making agenda and the allocation of resources to law-making is crucial for the development of international law (Boyle and Chinkin, 2007). That is to say, shifting power within the international community may eventually materialize in changing international law. It is therefore very interesting to observe the rise of Asian powers, especially China, and its implications for the future of global governance

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‘Observing’ the Arctic

Asia in the Arctic Council and Beyond

Edited by Chih Y. Woon and Klaus Dodds

Addressing the growing economic, political, and cultural presence of Asian states in the Arctic region, this timely book looks at how that presence is being evaluated and engaged with by Arctic states and their northern communities. A diverse range of authors addresses the question that underpins so much of this interest in Asian engagement with the northern latitudes: what do Asian countries want to gain from the Arctic?
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Edited by Chih Y. Woon and Klaus Dodds

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Smart Cities in Asia

Governing Development in the Era of Hyper-Connectivity

Edited by Yu-Min Joo and Teck-Boon Tan

At a time when Asia is rapidly growing in global influence, this much-needed and insightful book bridges two major current policy topics in order to offer a unique study of the latest smart city archetypes emerging throughout Asia. Highlighting the smart city aspirations of Asian countries and their role in Asian governments’ new development strategies, this book draws out timely narratives and insights from a uniquely Asian context and policymaking space.
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Pui-yin Ho

Hong Kong’s planning in 1979 was at first a response to the implementation of the reform and opening-up policy in China, adjusting Hong Kong’s economic structure from manufacturing industry to the enhancement of entrepôt trade and financial activities. China and Britain began talks on the return of Hong Kong’s sovereignty to China in 1997 in the early 1980s. As Britain’s hope for the right to rule in exchange for sovereignty did not come to fruition, the colonial government promptly cancelled plans to build a new airport and opted instead to expand Kai Tak Airport to address short-term needs. Hong Kong’s economy plunged following the democracy movement incidents in May and June of 1989. The government launched the 100 billion Hong Kong dollar Airport Core Programme to boost the economy. With a sizeable transportation network, the city was able to expand considerably.

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Pui-yin Ho

Urban planning and development are important elements in enhancing the competitiveness of Hong Kong. In the 1990s, West Kowloon and South East Kowloon were the focus areas to alleviate congestion in Central and Tsim Sha Tsui. North West and North East New Territories were given development priority. Great importance was attached to the living quality of residents. Consideration was given to population density, green space ratio, air quality, and the protection of traditional agricultural practices and the natural environment. As an economic powerhouse in southern China, Hong Kong has to take into account the needs of neighbouring regions in the expansion of its urban territory and trade activities. Transport facilities for sea and land networks and a boundary control point connecting Hong Kong to eastern Guangdong Province will be added to strengthen ties between Hong Kong and the Mainland. This represented a major change in Hong Kong’s development strategy after its return to China.

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Pui-yin Ho