Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 52 items :

  • Gender and Management x
  • Social Policy and Sociology x
Clear All
This content is available to you

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Coaching shares similarities with other interventions, such as mentoring and counselling, however it is important to consider that coaching has unique characteristics. This chapter provides a review of the coaching literature, focusing on defining coaching and examining the similarities and differences between coaching and other development interventions, such as mentoring. The chapter explores the coaching relationship, particularly focusing on the process, forms of delivery, requirements of the coach and the coachee, selecting a coach, boundaries in coaching relationships, barriers to effective coaching, learning and development in coaching, unsuccessful relationships and coaching in small businesses. Despite a wealth of toolkits and literature describing the coaching process, the majority of models appear to assume that all coaching relationships are homogenous, with an absence of research examining how coaching relationships evolve over time. Whilst there have been some studies to show the effectiveness of coaching programmes, there is limited empirical research examining how individuals learn and develop in coaching relationships, particularly examining different groups of individuals.
You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

This is the first book to present a comprehensive understanding of the role of coaching in developing women entrepreneurs. It provides a theoretical background and explores the distinctive challenges facing this group before discussing the implementation and outcomes from a coaching programme in an entrepreneurial setting. Finally, the book concludes with strategies for future research and progress.
You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

The TEC programme was an e-coaching programme designed to provide business support provision for women entrepreneurs. Chapter 6 presents the design and implementation of the programme, which was specifically designed to provide one-to-one, individualistic, women focused support via a six month coaching relationship. The programme was comprised of a number of core components which were all essential for building a structured coaching relationship for women entrepreneurs. The overall design of the programme was underpinned by previous literature and evaluated throughout.
You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

The majority of coaching models and frameworks assume that all coaching relationships are homogenous, therefore failing to differentiate between factors such as gender. The findings from this research add to the existing literature to show the potential of coaching to facilitate learning outcomes, specifically examining how entrepreneurs develop entrepreneurial self-efficacy and how coachees learn and acquire new knowledge in coaching relationships. This chapter attempts to address some of the intricacies of how coaching is developed in terms of individual relationships and how coaching is experienced by women and, from this, draw a picture of the space in which the coaching relationship is developed. The findings presented in this chapter provide evidence to suggest that coaching relationships can have a positive impact on entrepreneurial self-efficacy, which further implies that coaching interventions can have a positive impact on women entrepreneurs’ perception of their capabilities.
You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Whilst the need to constantly develop in the current economic climate is not a gender issue, arguably women may require more support through such periods as they often lack familiarity with the business world and, unlike their male counterparts, may not have extensive access to business networks and contacts. Human and social capital are important factors contributing to entrepreneurial success and as a consequence this chapter explores the impact of human and social capital on influencing women’s success in entrepreneurship. Despite the problems faced by women attempting to access support, there appears to be limited research examining what women actually want and need from business support services, in terms of both content and delivery. It is important to understand the issues faced by women entrepreneurs in order to provide the support needed to develop women-owned businesses.
This content is available to you

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Research suggests that self-efficacy is not a static trait, rather it is something that can be changed, therefore supporting the view that targeted programmes for entrepreneurs can be used to develop entrepreneurial self-efficacy. This chapter presents the quantitative findings from the evaluation of an e-coaching programme for female entrepreneurs, particularly in relation to general entrepreneurial attitudes, entrepreneurial self-efficacy and formal and informal support. The findings support the view that education and development to enhance entrepreneurial self-efficacy are appropriate for women entrepreneurs. The findings presented in this chapter demonstrate how coaching has the potential to enhance entrepreneurial self-efficacy, supporting the social cognitive literature which suggests that development interventions, such as coaching, can have a positive effect on an individual’s perception regarding their own capabilities. Although self-efficacy is on the whole task specific, self-efficacy measurement of one task may be generalized, therefore, the findings presented in this chapter suggest that women entrepreneurs’ increase in entrepreneurial self-efficacy may also impact on a wider variety of business skills.
You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Chapter 9 specifically focuses on the contribution of this research to theoretical debates, the potential economic benefits that an online coaching programme can provide, the transferability of this form of development to other minority groups and settings, and strategies for future research and progress. The chapter illustrates how the findings contribute to learning and theoretical debates by providing an understanding of women entrepreneurs’ needs, specifically focusing on how coaching for women entrepreneurs provides a potential support mechanism which can help to overcome internal and external barriers faced by women starting out in business. It also adds to the literature on self-efficacy, coaching and learning by providing empirical evidence to illustrate how coaching interventions, including the use of online methods, can have a positive impact on entrepreneurial self-efficacy, general entrepreneurial attitudes and locus of control.
You do not have access to this content

Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Research has shown that women tend to have lower entrepreneurial self-efficacy and lower entrepreneurial intentions than their male counterparts. Chapter 2 illustrates the characteristics of female entrepreneurs and discusses the gendered nature of entrepreneurship and the importance of designing support that is tailored to the needs of female entrepreneurs. The chapter focuses on the internal influences on women entrepreneurs, the importance of entrepreneurial learning and the role of entrepreneurial self-efficacy. Research suggests that exploring methods to develop women entrepreneurs’ self-efficacy and confidence, particularly in relation to entrepreneurial learning and development, is a key addition to the literature.