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Edited by Eiji Ogawa, Kolja Raube, Dimitri Vanoverbeke, Jan Wouters and with Camille Van der Vorst

This timely book explores the relationship between Japan and the European Union as they work increasingly closely together in many areas of global governance. It discusses the most salient areas of such cooperation from a range of perspectives, while examining not just convergences but also differences, in light of the recent EU–Japan Economic Partnership Agreement and Strategic Partnership Agreement.
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After Brexit, What Next?

Trade, Regulation and Economic Growth

Patrick Minford and David Meenagh

This timely book sets out a shrewd and comprehensive policy programme, for both ‘microeconomic’ supply-side settings of tax and regulatory systems, and ‘macroeconomic’ policies for fiscal and monetary policies to regulate demand and support the supply-side growth agenda.
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Patrick Minford and David Meenagh

In this book, the themes of my earlier book, Should Britain Leave the EU? (Minford et al., 2015), are pulled together to discuss how we should follow up with post-Brexit policies, now that Brexit has finally taken place. ‘What should Britain do, having left the EU?’ This is what this book aims to answer. As before, I will rely heavily on research that my co-authors and I have done, mostly now in Cardiff over the last 20 years, building on earlier work in Liverpool over the previous 20.

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Patrick Minford and David Meenagh

Open access

Leonardo Meeus

In the evolution of electricity markets in Europe, day-ahead markets have received most attention. It took a long time to integrate these markets, but the process is almost complete. What was considered impossible at the start has been achieved. Intraday markets have been slower in their development, but they are becoming more important with the transition to renewable energy. In balancing markets, the definition of standard products and the creation of European platforms to exchange these products across borders is a relatively new ambition, but much has been achieved in a relatively short time. Of course, the devil is in the details, so implementation in the coming years will need to be closely monitored.

Open access

Leonardo Meeus

Bridging theory and practice, this book offers insights into how Europe has experienced the evolution of modern electricity markets from the end of the 1990s to the present day. It explores defining moments in the process, including the four waves of European legislative packages, landmark court cases, and the impact of climate strikes and marches.