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Edited by Edward W. Fuller

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Edited by Edward W. Fuller

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Edited by Edward W. Fuller

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A Source Book on Early Monetary Thought

Writings on Money before Adam Smith

Edited by Edward W. Fuller

This volume contains thirty-seven contributions from the most significant early developers of monetary economics. Starting with Aristotle, the collection tracks the development of the modern theory of money through the ages by thinkers like Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Jean Buridan, Martin de Azpilcueta, John Locke, Richard Cantillon, David Hume, and A.R.J Turgot.
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Imad A. Moosa

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Imad A. Moosa

In this fascinating book, Imad A. Moosa challenges existing preconceptions surrounding normative economics, arguing that what some economists see as undisputed facts of life may be myths caused by dogmatic thinking. Plausible explanations are suggested for puzzles in various areas of economics and finance, such as the home bias puzzle, the PPP puzzle and the presidential puzzle. Controversies in Economics and Finance is a thought-provoking and stimulating read that exposes common flaws in economic analysis. It will be of great benefit to academics, graduate students and policy-makers looking to understand the limits of economic analysis.
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Imad A. Moosa

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Imad A. Moosa

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Managing the Cooperative Enterprise

The Rise of Worker-Controlled Firms

Bruno Jossa

This book revolves around the idea that capitalism is not a democratic system and that a system of producer cooperatives, or democratically managed enterprises, gives rise to a new mode of production which is authentically socialist in essence and fully consistent with the ultimate rationale underlying Marx’s theoretical approach. The author argues that the cooperative firm system outlined in this book offers a rich array of non-economic benefits that justify its classification as a ‘genuinely socialist’ entity, with real potential for achieving true economic democracy.