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Stephan Klasen

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Stephan Klasen

This impressive research review discusses the most important contributions by some of the leading scholars in the field of poverty measurement. It analyses what constitutes poverty and associated poverty measures, as well as conceptual and empirical approaches to set poverty lines for both national and international settings. The papers discussed in this research review also discuss national and international income poverty measures, multidimensional poverty indices, and ways to capture poverty dynamics.
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Stephan Klasen

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Stephan Klasen

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Nanak Kakwani and Hyun Hwa Son

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Nanak Kakwani and Hyun Hwa Son

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Nanak Kakwani and Hyun Hwa Son

This research review offers an insight to some of the most important questions economists and policymakers have been grappling over. A substantial amount of research has been carried out using cross-country regression models, resulting in a better and improved understanding of the linkage between economic growth and poverty reduction. The literature on cross-country regressions, however, has led to conflicting conclusions. Reconciling diverging messages makes it difficult to accurately inform policy-making. Based on a selection of influential papers, this volume provides a critical review of the literature. Scholars who envision a world free of extreme poverty will find this analysis particularly valuable.
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Nanak Kakwani and Hyun Hwa Son

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Lasse Gerrits and Stefan Verweij

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Lasse Gerrits and Stefan Verweij

We argue that infrastructure projects are complex and that evaluations of such projects need to do justice to that complexity. The three principal aspects discussed here are heterogeneity, uniqueness, and context. Evaluations that are serious about incorporating the complexity of projects need to address these aspects. Often, evaluations rely on single case studies. Such studies are useful because they allow researchers to focus on the heterogeneous, unique, and contextual nature of projects. However, their relevance for explaining other (future) projects is limited. Larger-n studies allow for the comparison of cases, but they come with the important downside that their relevance for explaining single projects is limited because they cannot incorporate heterogeneity, uniqueness, and context sufficiently. The method Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) presents a promising solution to this conundrum. This book offers a guide to using QCA when evaluating infrastructure projects.