Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 45,478 items :

  • Economics and Finance x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Malthus Across Nations

The Reception of Thomas Robert Malthus in Europe, America and Japan

Edited by Gilbert Faccarello, Masashi Izumo and Hiromi Morishita

The writings of Thomas Robert Malthus continue to resonate today, particularly An Essay on the Principle of Population which was published more than two centuries ago. Malthus Across Nations creates a fascinating picture of the circulation of his economic and demographic ideas across different countries, highlighting the reception of his works in a variety of nations and cultures. This unique book offers not only a fascinating piece of comparative analysis in the history of economic thought but also places some of today’s most pressing debates into an accurate historical perspective, thereby improving our understanding of them.
This content is available to you

Edited by Jay P. Choi, Wonhyuk Lim and Sang-Hyop Lee

You do not have access to this content

Competition Law and Economics

Developments, Policies and Enforcement Trends in the US and Korea

Edited by Jay P. Choi, Wonhyuk Lim and Sang-Hyop Lee

In this exciting new book, an international team of experts compare market structures, in both global and Korean contexts, particularly focusing on the impact of foreign competition on market concentration and ways to improve market structure. It thoroughly investigates core competition problems, including international abuses of dominance, mergers and collusion, and vertical restraints. Contributions move beyond explaining the laws and practices of enforcement agencies, offering readers an insight into the trend of an ever-increasing interdependence among national economies, complemented by analyses of recent developments in the US and Canada.
This content is available to you

Jeong Pyo Choi

You do not have access to this content

The Idea of Technological Innovation

A Brief Alternative History

Benoît Godin

This timely book explores technological innovation as a concept, dissecting its emergence, development and use. Beno"t Godin offers an exciting new historiography of the subject, arguing that the study of innovation originates not from scholars but from practitioners of innovation.
This content is available to you

Benoît Godin

You do not have access to this content

Reiner Franke

This paper derives firms’ desired rate of utilization from an explicit maximization of a conjectured rate of profit at the micro level. Invoking a strategic complementarity, desired utilization is thus an increasing function of not only the profit share but also the actual utilization. Drawing on recent empirical material and a straightforward functional specification, the model is subsequently numerically calibrated. In particular, this ensures a unique solution for a steady-state position in which the actual and the endogenous desired rates of utilization coincide. On the other hand, it turns out that the anticipated losses of firms by not producing at the desired level are rather small. Hence there may be only weak pressure on them to close a utilization gap in the ordinary way by suitable adjustments in fixed investment. It is indicated that this finding may serve Kaleckian economists as a more rigorous justification for viewing their equilibria as pertaining to the long run, even if they allow actual utilization to deviate persistently from desired utilization.

You do not have access to this content

José A. Pérez-Montiel and Carles Manera Erbina

This paper tests the main postulates of the Sraffian supermultiplier model for the case of 16 European economies during the period 1995–2018. We adopt the methodology of Girardi and Pariboni (2016) and extend it to a panel framework. We apply panel unit root, cointegration, and causality tests that are robust to endogenous regressors, cross-sectional dependence and heterogeneity across countries. Our results are supportive of the Sraffian supermultiplier model. In a heterogeneous panel framework, autonomous demand and output follow a long-run equilibrium relationship and there exists panel long-run causality that goes unidirectionally from autonomous demand to output. We also empirically verify the investment accelerator (the mechanism that enables the dynamic stability of the model) by confirming the existence of same-sign panel causality running unidirectionally from the growth rate of autonomous demand to the investment share. Our results call for national economic policies aimed at promoting the components of autonomous demand that act as locomotives of growth in each country.