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Edited by Alexander Orakhelashvili

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Edited by Alexander Orakhelashvili

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Edited by Alexander Orakhelashvili

This updated and revised second edition, with contributions from renowned experts, provides a comprehensive scholarly framework for analyzing the theory and history of international law. Featuring an array of legal and interdisciplinary analyses, it focuses on those theories and developments that illuminate the central and timeless basic concepts and categories of the international legal system, highlighting the interdependency of various aspects of theory and history and demonstrating the connections between theory and practice.
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Edited by Deborah Healey, Michael Jacobs and Rhonda L. Smith

This comprehensive Handbook illuminates the objectives and economics behind competition law. It takes a global comparative approach to explore competition law and policy in a range of jurisdictions with differing political economies, legal systems and stages of development. A set of expert international contributors examine the operation and enforcement of competition law around the world in order to globalize discussions surrounding the foundational issues of this topic. In doing so, they not only reveal the range of approaches to competition law, but also identify certain basic economic concepts and types of anticompetitive conduct that are at the core of competition law.
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Edited by Deborah Healey, Michael Jacobs and Rhonda L. Smith

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Edited by Deborah Healey, Michael Jacobs and Rhonda L. Smith

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Computational Legal Studies

The Promise and Challenge of Data-Driven Research

Edited by Ryan Whalen

Featuring contributions from a diverse set of experts, this thought-provoking book offers a visionary introduction to the computational turn in law and the resulting emergence of the computational legal studies field. It explores how computational data creation, collection, and analysis techniques are transforming the way in which we comprehend and study the law, and the implications that this has for the future of legal studies.
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Ryan Whalen

This volume arrives at an important inflection point in the relationship between law and computation. Technological, scientific, and methodological developments are increasingly allowing computation to provide not just efficiencies in the traditional ways we practice or study the law, but new perspectives on the law and potential paradigmatic shifts in how we think about and understand it. These developments have already been major factors in the recent evolution of many other academic fields, as evidenced for example by the rise of computational social science, computational biology, the digital humanities, and many more emerged and still-emerging subdisciplines. Although law has perhaps lagged somewhat behind its peer disciplines in adopting and adapting computational research methods, that has begun to change in recent years as more and more legal scholars have begun applying computational methods in the course of their research. This volume explores this emergence of computational legal studies by presenting a variety of research that is either representative of, or in conversation with, the field. Before setting out to explore the state of computational legal studies, it is important first to provide at least a general delineation of what it might include and exclude. Computers and the law intersect in a variety of ways, none of which is entirely independent of one another, but all of which benefit from being independently identified in a discussion about computational legal studies. Perhaps the most common association between computers and the law is the substantive law that is increasingly faced with questions that arise as society becomes more and more digitally mediated. This area of study and practice is sometimes referred to as cyberlaw, and extends to a diverse set of legal areas including free expression, cybersecurity, privacy, and more. Although cyberlaw is broad in the legal areas it extends to, its scholarship is united by the central relevance of technology and technologically mediated social behavior to the questions it explores.

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Jean d'Aspremont

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Jean d'Aspremont

Encompassing the history and theory of international law, the author writes a timely and important review of this debated topic. Covering various topics including primitive legal scholarship, medieval law and the Grotian Tradition, this original piece explores the topic of International Law in a comprehensive and refreshing manner.