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Edited by Marc Hertogh and Richard Kirkham

The public sector ombudsman has become one of the most important administrative justice institutions in many countries around the world. This international and interdisciplinary Research Handbook brings together leading scholars and practitioners to discuss the state-of-the-art of ombudsman research. It uses new empirical studies and competing theoretical explanations to critically examine important aspects of the ombudsman’s work. This comprehensive Handbook is of value to academics designing future ombudsman studies and practitioners and policymakers in understanding the future challenges of the ombudsman.
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Edited by Marc Hertogh and Richard Kirkham

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Steen Treumer and Mario Comber

This chapter analyses the implementing legislation and the variations in the national legal systems, in section 2. The section includes analysis of preparatory works as a legal source that has proven to be of particular importance due to the substantial variations in the legal systems of the Member States. Goldplating and questionable legislation are considered in section 3 and selected issues of implementation (exclusion, competitive procedure with negotiation, contract changes) in section 4. The latter section also covers the Member States’ approach to the implementation of the recitals to the Directive. Section 5 relates to a range of provisions of the Directive that allow the Member States to implement various options and aims. Final conclusions are found in section 6

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Modernising Public Procurement

The Approach of EU Member States

Edited by Steen Treumer and Mario Comba

Modernising Public Procurement offers an in-depth analysis of the recent implementation of the Public Procurement Directive. The analysis is based on the experiences of twelve Member States including the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and Poland. Within this work, Steen Treumer and Mario Comba alongside first-class experts in the field of public procurement law, focus on so-called gold-plating (overimplementation) and issues where the legality of the implemented legislation is questionable.
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Edited by Steen Treumer and Mario Comba

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Edited by Steen Treumer and Mario Comba

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Iain Ramsay

Consumer credit, its role and regulation, has become a hot topic since the Great Recession of 2008. This chapter outlines an emerging international consensus on the regulation of credit markets and examines critically central aspects of this consensus: appropriate supervision of credit markets through regulatory agencies; the promotion of financial inclusion and access to credit at a reasonable cost; mandatory information disclosure; responsible lending; the facilitation of credit information through credit reference agencies; and financial literacy. It also examines the more controversial issue of price controls and concludes by analysing the role of payment intermediaries in providing redress in transnational purchases.

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Edited by Geraint Howells, Iain Ramsay and Thomas Wilhelmsson

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Edited by Geraint Howells, Iain Ramsay and Thomas Wilhelmsson

Consumer law and policy continues to be of great concern to both national and international regulatory bodies, and the second edition of the Handbook of Research on International Consumer Law provides an updated international and comparative analysis of the central legal and policy issues, in both developed and developing economies.
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Regulating Financial Derivatives

Clearing and Central Counterparties

Alexandra G. Balmer

This book puts forward a holistic approach to post-crisis derivatives regulation, providing insight into how new regulation has dealt with the risk that OTC derivatives pose to financial stability. It discusses the implications that post crisis regulation has had on central counterparties and the risk associated with clearing of OTC derivatives. The author offers a novel solution to tackle the potential negative externalities from the failure of a central counterparty and identifies potential new risks arising from post crisis reforms.