Browse by title

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,263 items :

  • Research Methods in Business and Management x
Clear All
You do not have access to this content

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

You do not have access to this content

Becoming an Organizational Scholar

Navigating the Academic Odyssey

Edited by Tomislav Hernaus and Matej Černe

Becoming an Organizational Scholar: Navigating the Academic Odyssey covers reflective, personal stories of prolific, top scholars under the age of 45, with academic success gained across 17 different European and North and South American countries at 31 higher education institutions. The editors present the idea of a unique or authentic scholar, presenting an overview of academic success factors and common career development obstacles while offering possible coping mechanisms.  
This content is available to you

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

You do not have access to this content

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

This informative Field Guide to Intercultural Research is specifically designed to be used in the field, guiding the reader away from pitfalls and towards best practice. It shares valuable fieldwork challenges and experiences, as well as insights into key methodological debates and practical recommendations relevant to both new and seasoned researchers.
This content is available to you

David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

The Field Guide to Intercultural Research, published by the internationally renowned publisher, Edward Elgar Publishing, invites readers to follow 48 authors into their research fields in nearly 20 different countries across the African, Asian, Australian, European and Middle Eastern regions. In 26 chapters, in addition to both a preface and an afterword, the authors who are representing more than 20 nationalities, narrate their experiences with solving intercultural challenges encountered during fieldwork - predominantly overseas but also in the home country.

This content is available to you

Edited by David S. A. Guttormsen, Jakob Lauring and Malcolm Chapman

You do not have access to this content

Indigo Holcombe-James and Ellie Rennie

Between 2015-2017, we worked with Australia’s largest telecommunications provider to examine the issue of cyber safety as it related to Australia’s remote Aboriginal communities. In this chapter, we reflect on our experience with survey-based research in remote Indigenous communities and recount our own failed attempts to navigate data collection. We argue that although often required by commercial and policy domains, quantitative data can be problematic when applied to Indigenous policy issues. We therefore advocate for an intercultural research model that is truly intercultural, from the researched, to the researchers.

This content is available to you

Gloria Barczak and Abbie Griffin

You do not have access to this content

Gloria Barczak and Abbie Griffin

Previous research has investigated portfolio decisions as individually discrete decisions. In this research, however, we find that portfolio decision-making can only be adequately addressed if it is considered as an integrated system of processes. Using data from four diverse cases, we develop a general framework for how new product development portfolio decisions are made in firms. According to the findings from these cases, the objective of a firm’s portfolio decision-making processes should be to achieve a portfolio mindset to focus effort on the right projects, and to be agile in decision-making about the portfolio. On the one hand, three domain-based decision input generating processes lead to evidence-based portfolio decision-making. In addition, organizational politics may result in power-based portfolio decision-making while managerial intuition may lead to opinion-based decision-making. Firm cultural factors, including trust, collective ambition, and leadership style, influence how these evidence-, power-, and opinion-based processes are combined into a whole, and whether the firm’s processes are more rational and objectively made, or more politically and intuitively made.

You do not have access to this content

Gloria Barczak and Abbie Griffin