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Edited by Stuart Cunningham and Terry Flew

Interdisciplinary, internationally focused, policy-informed, and strategic, this book sets out agendas for advancing research into creative industries as a productive and innovative intervention in public policy. With contributions from leading scholars, policy and industry specialists, this Research Agenda will be a vital resource for students and academics working in the fields of communication, culture, film and media, geography, business and policy studies, and Internet and social media studies.
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Edited by James G. Carrier

The financial crisis and its economic and political aftermath have changed the ways that many anthropologists approach economic activities, institutions and systems. This insightful volume presents important elements of this change. With topics ranging from the relationship of states and markets to the ways that anthropologists’ political preferences and assumptions harm their work, the book presents cogent statements by younger and established scholars of how existing research areas can be extended and the new avenues that ought to be pursued.
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Silvia Cerisola

The book explores the relationship between cultural heritage and local economic development by introducing the original idea that one possible mediator between the two can be identified as creativity. The book econometrically verifies this idea and demonstrates that cultural heritage, through its inspirational role on different creative talents, generates an indirect positive effect on local economic development. These results justify important new policy recommendations in the field of cultural heritage.
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Edited by Samuel Cameron

A Research Agenda for Cultural Economics explores the degree of progress and future directions for the field. An international range of contributors examine thoroughly matters of data quality, statistical methodology and the challenge of new developments in technology. This book is ideal for both emerging researchers in cultural economics and experienced practitioners. It is also relevant to workers in other fields such as cultural policy, public policy, media studies and digital economics.
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Samuel Cameron

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Samuel Cameron

This incisive review analyses the most influential academic research in a burgeoning subject - the economics of music. The literature stems from both mainstream economics journals as well as pertinent works from accountancy, sociology and management sources. Topics discussed include live music, music production, labour markets and ownership and music competitions. This review provides a valuable resource for students and economists involved in this fascinating field, as well as those seeking to enter it.
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Samuel Cameron

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Theocharis Grigoriadis

The chapter discusses the economic logic and political incentives that led to the emergence, peak, and contraction of Kulturkampf in the Catholic lands of Prussia between 1871 and 1878. It argues that Bismarck’s Kulturkampf reveals the fallacies of secularism as a series of enforced state policies: (1) De facto dominance of the religious majority over religious minorities that are in much higher need to preserve their public and social status; (2) Transformation of priests into bureaucratic experts. A game-theoretic model defining Kulturkampf as a static game between priests and the executive is proposed. The willingness of priests to accept the government’s offer and be transformed into bureaucratic experts varies. Individualist priests are easier to recruit as they care more about their personal welfare than social distribution by the Church, whereas the reverse holds for collectivist priests. Nevertheless, the success of the Kulturkampf depends on the effective recruitment of collectivist priests and their entry into formal politics in favor of the executive. The distinction between collectivism and individualism matters here, because priests can either care for the social welfare activity of the Church or their individual welfare. Secularization is not devoid of religion, as it consistently attracts more individualist rather than collectivist priests, and thus advocates a transition to more Protestant forms of government.

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Serena Rovai and Nicola Bellini

This chapter focuses on the profile of the new generation of Chinese creative entrepreneurs in the fashion and luxury industry and investigates, in an exploratory way, the mix of endogenous factors that support their growth in the specific context of the city of Beijing. Based on a review of the elements characterising the present stage of development of this industry and on the results of interviews of two emerging brands within a concept store hosting them, the authors argue that in the struggle to affirm the positive value of Chinese creativity, this new breed of entrepreneurs is developing a syncretic mix of Chinese, Asian and Western elements rather than proposing a nationalistic rediscovery of Chineseness. A Beijing effect is also visible, giving evidence of the relationship between art and fashion. Finally, their growth and success appears in tune with the government’s domestic and international policy.