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Edited by Meinhard Doelle and Sara L. Seck

This timely Research Handbook offers an insightful review of how legal systems – whether domestic, international or transnational – can and should adjust to fairly and effectively support loss and damage (L & D) claims in climate change law.  International contributors guide readers through a detailed assessment of the history and current state of L & D provisions under the UN climate regime and consider the opportunities to fund L & D claims both within and outside the UN climate system. 
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Edited by Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Marcel Brus, Panos Merkouris and Agnes Rydberg

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Edited by Malgosia Fitzmaurice, Marcel Brus, Panos Merkouris and Agnes Rydberg

This thoroughly updated and revised second edition of this foundational Handbook combines practical and theoretical analyses to cover a wide array of cutting edge issues in international environmental law (IEL). It provides a comprehensive view of the complexity of IEL, both as a field in its own right, and as part of the wider system of international law.
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Edited by David L. VanderZwaag, Nilüfer Oral and Tim Stephens

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Edited by David L. VanderZwaag, Nilüfer Oral and Tim Stephens

This important Research Handbook provides a guide to navigating the tangled array of laws and policies available to counter the ominous threats of ocean acidification. It investigates the limitations and opportunities for addressing ocean acidification under national, regional and global governance frameworks, including multilateral environmental agreements, law of the sea and human rights instruments.
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Edited by Francesco Sindico, Stephanie Switzer and Tianbao Qin

This cutting-edge book considers the functional inseparability of risk and innovation within the context of environmental law and governance. Analysing both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ innovation, the book argues that approaches to socio-ecological risk require innovation in order for society and the environment to become more resilient.
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Claire O’Manique, James K Rowe and Karena Shaw

Endless economic growth on a finite planet is impossible. This is the premise behind the degrowth movement. Despite this sound rationale, the degrowth movement has struggled to gain political acceptability. We have sought to understand this limited uptake of degrowth discourse in the English-speaking world by interviewing Canadian activists. Activists have a proximity to the political realm – both with its barriers and openings – that scholars working primarily in academic institutions sometimes lack. Our interviews reveal that class interests – particularly those of fossil fuel companies – are a substantial barrier to realizing degrowth goals. Interviewees highlighted the importance of centring class-conscious environmentalism, ‘anti-purity’ politics, and decolonization as essential parts of a degrowth agenda capable of overcoming these class interests. We conclude by unpacking how the Green New Deal – a discourse and movement that gained considerable traction after we completed our interviews – addresses the obstacles shared by our interviewees, thus making it a promising ‘non-reformist reform’ for the degrowth movement to pursue.

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Edited by Anna Grear