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David J. Maurrasse

With more than 5.3 million inhabitants, Victoria is the second most populous state in Australia. For the Victorian government, public participation plays a central role in government decision making and developing effective strategies, programs, and projects. According to the Victorian Auditor Generals Office, public participation is embedded or supported in key pieces of Victorian legislation because it makes good sense and is consistent with a system where governments spend public funds to benefit the community.

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David J. Maurrasse

This context brings us to future opportunities for community partnerships. Between the pandemic's exacerbation of existing inequities and the increasingly apparent impacts of climate change, much more will be expected of community partnerships. In fact, much more will be expected of the nonprofit sector, philanthropy, and government in particular. Leadership has always played an important role in community partnerships, especially because these formations require intentional effort. They don't naturally emerge. They are unconventional. The leadership of philanthropy has played a crucial role in the development of most of the community partnerships profiled herein. Philanthropy brings the flexibility and resources for innovative thinking. This kind of thinking will be quite significant into the future, as we will be challenged to consider what it will take to actually solve pressing social problems.

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David J. Maurrasse

Community partnerships are distinct from traditional conceptions of public/private partnerships. Community partnerships are uniquely contextual. They are comprised of various institutions emerging from a locality's particular ecosystem of organizations across sectors. Community partnerships tend to include some variation of types of nongovernmental organization.

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David J. Maurrasse

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David J. Maurrasse

This important book focuses on particular aspects of the development and implementation of community partnerships based in – and focused – on neighborhoods, municipalities, and regions. Throughout the book, David J. Maurrasse stresses the importance of philanthropy and representation from different types of organizations across public, private, and nongovernmental spectrums.
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David J. Maurrasse

Considering how these partnerships achieve success, effective community partnerships are mission-driven. With a sense of a defined mission, community partnerships have clear goals and a mutual set of beliefs among partners. This enables smoother working processes with less incidence of conflicting priorities. Indeed, conflicting priorities are always present, but successful partnerships leverage a clear mission in order to transcend competing interests. Effective partnerships not only convene institutions around mutual interests, they design their work in service of partners' commonalities.

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Lilac Nachum and Yoshiteru Uramoto

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The Contest for Value in Global Value Chains

Correcting for Distorted Distribution in the Global Apparel Industry

Lilac Nachum and Yoshiteru Uramoto

Who captures the value created in global supply chains? How should gaps in value capture among participants be amended and by whom? Focusing on the global apparel supply chain and employing value creation as a yardstick for evaluation of value capture, the book documents distortions in value distribution among global brands, manufacturers, labor, and consumers. It develops a novel approach for correcting for these distortions by creating a market for social justice that is based on interdependence relationships among the participants.
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Lilac Nachum and Yoshiteru Uramoto

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Mariya Aleksynska, Andrey Shevchuk and Denis Strebkov

The turn of the millennium marked the emergence of a new type of labour market in which workers - often referred to as freelancers - digitally deliver services to clients through dedicated online labour platforms.One important feature of these labour markets is that they potentially do not have geographical boundaries. In contrast to place-based digital platforms, such as taxi or delivery apps, online labour platforms match workers from any location to global pools of work opportunities without requiring workers' physical mobility (Horton 2010; Malone and Laubacher 1998; Graham et al. 2017). As such, they help to overcome distances and constraints of local demand through 'virtual migration' (Aneesh 2006). Given this, the development of online labour markets has been heralded as leading to the 'flat world' (Friedman 2007) and making spatial location increasingly irrelevant to economic activity.