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Edited by Valerie Stead, Carole Elliott and Sharon Mavin

This timely Handbook of Research Methods on Gender and Management exemplifies the multiplicity of gender and management research and provides effective guidance for putting methods into practice.
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Field Guide for Research in Community Settings

Tools, Methods, Challenges and Strategies

Edited by M. R. Islam, Niaz A. Khan, Siti H.A.B. Ah, Haris A. Wahab and Mashitah B. Hamidi

This insightful book offers practical advice to fieldworkers in social research, enabling robust and judicious applications of research methods and techniques in data collection. It also outlines data collection challenges that are commonly faced when working in the field.
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M. Rezaul Islam, Niaz Ahmed Khan, Siti Hajar Abu Bakar Ah, Haris Abd Wahab and Mashitah Binti Hamidi

Fieldwork/data collection is one of the most important parts in the research process, and it is particularly important for social sciences research. A number of aspects that need to be considered by a researcher before starting data collection include: ethical permission from the concerned ethical body/committee, informed consent, contract with different stakeholders, field settings, time allocation and time management, field leading, data collection, contextual and cultural diversities, community settings, socioeconomic and psychological patterns of the community, political pattern, rapport building between data collectors and respondents, permission to access community, language and mode of data collection, power relations, role of gatekeepers, privacy and confidentiality issues, layers of expectations among researchers/respondents/ funding organization, data recording (written, memorization, voice recording and video recording), and so on. Many aspects are very difficult to understand before going into the field. Sometimes, a researcher’s previous experience about a particular community may help to gain field access, but it may be difficult to assess the field in advance due to rapid changes within people’s livelihoods and other shifts in the community. The change of a political paradigm sometimes seems also to be a challenge at the field level. We believe that although technological innovation has benefited some aspects of the data collection of fieldwork in social research, many other dimensions (mentioned above) of fieldwork endure unchanged.

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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Coaching shares similarities with other interventions, such as mentoring and counselling, however it is important to consider that coaching has unique characteristics. This chapter provides a review of the coaching literature, focusing on defining coaching and examining the similarities and differences between coaching and other development interventions, such as mentoring. The chapter explores the coaching relationship, particularly focusing on the process, forms of delivery, requirements of the coach and the coachee, selecting a coach, boundaries in coaching relationships, barriers to effective coaching, learning and development in coaching, unsuccessful relationships and coaching in small businesses. Despite a wealth of toolkits and literature describing the coaching process, the majority of models appear to assume that all coaching relationships are homogenous, with an absence of research examining how coaching relationships evolve over time. Whilst there have been some studies to show the effectiveness of coaching programmes, there is limited empirical research examining how individuals learn and develop in coaching relationships, particularly examining different groups of individuals.
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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

This is the first book to present a comprehensive understanding of the role of coaching in developing women entrepreneurs. It provides a theoretical background and explores the distinctive challenges facing this group before discussing the implementation and outcomes from a coaching programme in an entrepreneurial setting. Finally, the book concludes with strategies for future research and progress.
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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

The TEC programme was an e-coaching programme designed to provide business support provision for women entrepreneurs. Chapter 6 presents the design and implementation of the programme, which was specifically designed to provide one-to-one, individualistic, women focused support via a six month coaching relationship. The programme was comprised of a number of core components which were all essential for building a structured coaching relationship for women entrepreneurs. The overall design of the programme was underpinned by previous literature and evaluated throughout.
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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

The majority of coaching models and frameworks assume that all coaching relationships are homogenous, therefore failing to differentiate between factors such as gender. The findings from this research add to the existing literature to show the potential of coaching to facilitate learning outcomes, specifically examining how entrepreneurs develop entrepreneurial self-efficacy and how coachees learn and acquire new knowledge in coaching relationships. This chapter attempts to address some of the intricacies of how coaching is developed in terms of individual relationships and how coaching is experienced by women and, from this, draw a picture of the space in which the coaching relationship is developed. The findings presented in this chapter provide evidence to suggest that coaching relationships can have a positive impact on entrepreneurial self-efficacy, which further implies that coaching interventions can have a positive impact on women entrepreneurs’ perception of their capabilities.
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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden

Whilst the need to constantly develop in the current economic climate is not a gender issue, arguably women may require more support through such periods as they often lack familiarity with the business world and, unlike their male counterparts, may not have extensive access to business networks and contacts. Human and social capital are important factors contributing to entrepreneurial success and as a consequence this chapter explores the impact of human and social capital on influencing women’s success in entrepreneurship. Despite the problems faced by women attempting to access support, there appears to be limited research examining what women actually want and need from business support services, in terms of both content and delivery. It is important to understand the issues faced by women entrepreneurs in order to provide the support needed to develop women-owned businesses.
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Carianne M. Hunt and Sandra L. Fielden