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Competitive Accountability in Academic Life

The Struggle for Social Impact and Public Legitimacy

Richard Watermeyer

This book considers how a culture of ‘competitive accountability’ in UK higher education produces multiple tensions, contradictions and paradoxes that are destabilizing and deleterious to the work and identities of academics as research scientists. It suggests the potential of a new discourse of scientific accountability, that frees scientists and their public communities from the absurdities and profligacy of ‘performativity’ and ‘managerial governmentality’ encountered in the REF and an impact agenda – the noose of competitive accountability – and a more honest and meaningful public contract.
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Richard Watermeyer

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Richard Watermeyer

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Edited by Ruth Bridgstock and Neil Tippett

This book challenges the dominant ‘employability skills’ discourse by exploring socially connected and networked perspectives to learning and teaching in higher education. Both learning and career development happen naturally and optimally in ecologies, informal communities and partnerships. In the digital age, they are also highly networked. This book presents ten empirical case studies of educational practice that investigate the development of learner capabilities, teaching approaches, and institutional strategies in higher education, to foster lifelong graduate employability through social connectedness.
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Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman

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Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman

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Edited by Suzanne C. de Janasz and Joanna Crossman

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Ellen A. Ensher, Madeline Crocitto and Monika Renard

What should employees be paid, and what benefits should they receive? How much are they worth, and what are ways to measure this? And what are some of the challenges of getting compensation right … and what happens when you don’t? The exercises included here provide a variety of opportunities for students to analyze and apply tools to achieve an equitable approach to paying employees. In addition, several exercises enable students to critically analyze and be able to negotiate what they’re worth.

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Jeffrey A. Mello, Joy Turnheim Smith, Beverly J. De Marr, Joseph Seltzer, Vicki Fairbanks Taylor, Cristina Arroyo, Madeline Crocitto and Jason Myrowitz

Even when selection, training, and performance appraisal symptoms work well, conflicts which require intervention and, sometimes, disciplinary action, inevitably arise. Humans are not always kind to one another in their family homes … let alone inside a workplace. What are the nature and origin of typical organizational conflicts? What kinds of issues can be avoided or placed on hold, and which ones require immediate intervention from management or HR? This chapter features eight diverse exercises that explore issues of discrimination, harassment, and even termination.

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Colette A. Frayne, Mary B. Teagarden, Elisabeth K. Kelan, Victoria Mattingly, Kevin M. Walters, Katrina Thompson, Susan Dustin, Elizabeth A. Cooper, Robyn Berkley, Diana Smrt and Gary Stark

Many countries have enacted a set of laws designed to protect individuals and groups from discrimination, for example on the basis of race, gender, age, ability, sexual orientation. Such laws help to ensure equal or fair treatment. In this chapter, we have attempted to focus on the application of such laws, as opposed to clarifying them in specific terms. The eight exercises build student awareness of conscious and unconscious biases and how they can result in unfair, illegal, or discriminatory treatment of individuals and groups. The exercises are designed to be delivered in-class and beyond, encouraging interaction with people out of class, who acknowledge an identity that differs from each student in some way. These kinds of experiential activities also encourage personal reflection and meaningful, deep learning.