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David Williamson and Gary Lynch-Wood

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The Structure of Regulation

Explaining Why Regulation Succeeds and Fails

David Williamson and Gary Lynch-Wood

This timely and original book provides an exploration of the factors that combine to determine the form of regulatory problems and the overall success or failure of regulation. Using environmental regulation as a basis for analysis, this book puts forward a theoretical framework for the design of effective regulation and demonstrates how businesses’ compliance with environmental regulation, in particular, could be improved.
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Carbon Markets Around the Globe

Sustainability and Political Feasibility

Sven Rudolph and Elena Aydos

In this timely book, Sven Rudolph and Elena Aydos take an interdisciplinary approach that combines sustainability economics, political economy, and legal concepts to answer two fundamental questions: How can carbon markets be designed to be effective, efficient and just at the same time? And how can the political barriers to sustainable carbon markets be overcome? The authors advance existing theoretical frameworks and examine empirical data from various real-life emissions trading schemes, identifying strategies and policy windows for implementing truly sustainable ETS.
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Edited by Edwin Woerdman, Martha Roggenkamp and Marijn Holwerda

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Edited by Edwin Woerdman, Martha Roggenkamp and Marijn Holwerda

Written by leading scholars of EU climate law from the University of Groningen, chapters address the relevant directives and regulations, examining their implementation and impact on current policy and academic debate. The textbook introduces the main climate mitigation targets and instruments of the EU, analysing all available legal instruments to mitigate climate change, ranging from greenhouse gas emissions trading to the use of renewable energy sources and energy efficiency mechanisms. In addition, the book provides an analysis of some overarching issues, such as the impact of climate law on energy network regulation, multi-level governance and protection of human rights.
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Edited by Edwin Woerdman, Martha Roggenkamp and Marijn Holwerda

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Edited by Edwin Woerdman, Martha Roggenkamp and Marijn Holwerda

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Edited by Edwin Woerdman, Martha Roggenkamp and Marijn Holwerda

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Edited by Edwin Woerdman, Martha Roggenkamp and Marijn Holwerda

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Kenny Ng

Marine invasive alien species are sea-based organisms that are non-native to a marine ecosystem, and which can or have spread to a degree that has an adverse impact on biodiversity and human livelihoods. In a globalized and inter-connected world, the threats posed by marine invasive alien species are here to stay. Accordingly, it often has been lamented that the threats from marine alien species are too difficult to combat effectively. In Australia, these threats are exacerbated by the country's unique characteristics such as its sheer size, as well as its geographical and historical isolation from the rest of the world. More importantly for the purposes of this article, Australia's unique constitutional framework that entrenches its national system of federalism has led to complex power-sharing arrangements between the Commonwealth, and the State and Territory governments in the management of invasive alien species, which are arguably inadequate to combat marine invasive alien species effectively. In Australia, laws have been made to manage only one vector of marine invasive species, ballast water from vessels, but not for other vectors. This article analyses how marine invasive alien species are currently managed within the Australian legal framework, and discusses what can be done to improve the status quo in order effectively to control the spread of such foreign organisms. It argues with optimism that marine invasive alien species can be effectively managed under a strong legal framework that seeks to prevent their occurrence and minimize the negative impacts of their occurrence. Such a legal framework consists of sound domestic laws and institutions, the effects of which can be enhanced by greater international cooperation.