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Michael C. LaBelle

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Energy Cultures

Technology, Justice, and Geopolitics in Eastern Europe

Michael C. LaBelle

This thought-provoking book explores the concept of energy cultures as a means of understanding social and political relations and how energy injustices are created. Using Eastern Europe as an example, it examines the radical transition occurring as the region leaves behind the legacy of the Soviet Union, and the effects of the resulting power struggle between the energy cultures of Russia and the European Union.
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Michael C. LaBelle

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Michael C. LaBelle

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Energy Transitions in Mediterranean Countries

Consumption, Emissions and Security of Supplies

Silvana Bartoletto

This illuminating book analyses energy transitions, carbon dioxide emissions and the security of energy supply in Mediterranean countries. Unpacking the history of energy transitions, from coal to oil and natural gas, and from non-renewable to renewable energy sources, Silvana Bartoletto offers a comparative approach to the major trends in energy consumption, production, trade and security in Mediterranean countries in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa.
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Silvana Bartoletto

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Silvana Bartoletto

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Nengye Liu

Henry Kissinger, in his book World Order, describes order as: “The concept held by a region or civilization about the nature of just arrangements and the distribution of power thought to be applicable to the entire world” (Kissinger, 2015: 9). The United States of America, together with its Western allies, constructed the existing rules-based order that has governed the world since the Second World War. International law is at the core of the rules-based international order (Scott, 2017). However, who determines the law-making agenda and the allocation of resources to law-making is crucial for the development of international law (Boyle and Chinkin, 2007). That is to say, shifting power within the international community may eventually materialize in changing international law. It is therefore very interesting to observe the rise of Asian powers, especially China, and its implications for the future of global governance

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‘Observing’ the Arctic

Asia in the Arctic Council and Beyond

Edited by Chih Y. Woon and Klaus Dodds

Addressing the growing economic, political, and cultural presence of Asian states in the Arctic region, this timely book looks at how that presence is being evaluated and engaged with by Arctic states and their northern communities. A diverse range of authors addresses the question that underpins so much of this interest in Asian engagement with the northern latitudes: what do Asian countries want to gain from the Arctic?
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Edited by Chih Y. Woon and Klaus Dodds