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Organizational Innovation

Theory, Research, and Direction

Fariborz Damanpour

This comprehensive book synthesizes research from the past 50 years of innovation studies, addressing the main elements of innovation and providing a connected perspective on innovation within organizations. It explores the generation and adoption of both technological and nontechnological innovations, offering a coherent and systematic view of the process. Insights from behavioral, economic and structure-based perspectives are used to explain existing findings and help the reader navigate current research, as well as offering ideas and frameworks to guide new studies.
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Fariborz Damanpour

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Fariborz Damanpour

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The Imagined Organization

Spaces, Dreams and Places

Monika Kostera

This book represents a narrative quest for a symbolic grounding to help leaders in times when stable social structures and institutions dissolve and disappear. Monika Kostera approaches this sense-making process through innovative research methods, collecting stories from participants and exploring plots and outcomes of an imagined meeting between two symbolic worlds: one of the internal and imaginative and the other of the external and corporate.
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Barbara Czarniawska and Bernward Joerges

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Robotization of Work?

Answers from Popular Culture, Media and Social Sciences

Barbara Czarniawska and Bernward Joerges

In this timely book, Barbara Czarniawska and Bernward Joerges examine the hopes and fears around work and job security inspired by automation, from the original coining of the term ‘robot’ to the present day media fascination. Have these hopes and fears changed or do they remain the same? This discerning book investigates whether these changes in perception correlate to actual changes taking place in the field of robotics.
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Edited by Helen Lawton Smith, Colette Henry, Henry Etzkowitz and Alexandra Poulovassilis

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Edited by Helen Lawton Smith, Colette Henry, Henry Etzkowitz and Alexandra Poulovassilis

Gender, Science and Innovation explores the contemporary challenges facing women scientists in academia and develops effective strategies to improve gender equality. Addressing an important gap in current knowledge, chapters offer a range of international perspectives from diverse contexts, countries and institutional settings. This book is an essential contribution to the literature for academics, researchers and policy makers concerned with improving gender equality in academia and seeking to learn from the experiences of others.
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Big Data

Promise, Application and Pitfalls

Edited by John Storm Pedersen and Adrian Wilkinson

Big data and 'the package' of the digital society is de-mystified in this important book. A group of international experts frame the debates around big data and analyse its impact in different sectors in practice. They also examine whether big data and the digital society can deliver on its promises.
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Lene Foss and Colette Henry

This chapter critically explores how gender is conceptualized in extant innovation research scholarship. The authors analyse a selection of published research articles, categorizing them according to the various themes adopted: traditional innovation and definitional issues; management styles, performance and teams; organisational structures and networks; and gendered stereotypes, feminist resistance, and gendered processes of innovation. The chapter also considers how researchers define innovation, and how they illustrate the relationship between gender and innovation. Findings indicate that published scholarship in this field lacks a robust discussion of the relationship between gender and innovation, with few articles positioning themselves within specific gender perspectives. The field has become restricted to the extent that only male innovation norms are studied and highlighted. The authors conclude that innovation research is lagging behind in terms of its perspectives on how gender is ‘done’, compared to other fields such as entrepreneurship where feminist epistemology is more developed. Avenues worthy of future research are identified.