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Mark Goodale

This afterword to the volume offers critical reflections on the book’s major contributions and situates them in relation to wider debates over the future of the International Criminal Court, the possibilities for international justice, and the question of whether or not human rights should remain an important part of international law. More specifically, the afterword examines the ways in which the volume privileges a distance-near perspective on the relationship between law and culture at the ICC, including, importantly, insiders’ accounts of how culture shapes the inner workings of the Court, its administrative and prosecutorial activities, and its responses to wider critiques of its investigations. The afterword concludes by considering the volume’s central claim that it is through a study of the intersections of law and culture that we can best understand the dilemmas faced by the Court and its prospects for the future.

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Edited by Julie Fraser and Brianne McGonigle Leyh

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Edited by Julie Fraser and Brianne McGonigle Leyh

This pioneering book explores the intersections of law and culture at the International Criminal Court (ICC), offering insights into how notions of culture affect the Court’s legal foundations, functioning and legitimacy, both in theory and in practice.
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Romola Adeola

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Romola Adeola

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Romola Adeola

While the plight of persons displaced within the borders of states has emerged as a global concern, not much attention has been given to this specific category of persons in international legal scholarship. Unlike refugees, internally displaced persons remain within the states in which they are displaced. Current statistics indicate that there are more people displaced within state borders than persons displaced outside states. Romola Adeola examines the protection of the internally displaced person under international law, considering existing legal regimes at various levels of governance and institutional mechanisms for internally displaced persons.
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Hired Guns and Human Rights

Global Governance and Access to Remedies in the Private Military and Security Industry

Kuzi Charamba

This innovative book provides an overview and critical assessment of the current avenues and remedies available to victims seeking recourse from private military and security companies (PMSCs) for human rights violations.
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Kuzi Charamba

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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

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Gregory H. Fox and Brad R. Roth

At the end of the Cold War, international law scholars engaged in furious debate over whether principles of democratic legitimacy had entered international law. Many argued that a “democratic entitlement” was then emerging. Others were skeptical that international practice in democracy promotion was either consistent or sufficiently widespread and many found the idea of a democratic entitlement dangerous. Those debates, while ongoing, have not been comprehensively revisited in almost twenty years. This research review identifies the leading scholarship of the past two decades on these and other questions. It focuses particular attention on the normative consequences of the recent “democratic recession” in many regions of the world.