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Edited by Jeffrey H. Cohen and Ibrahim Sirkeci

Capturing the important place and power role that culture plays in the decision-making process of migration, this Handbook looks at human movement outside of a vacuum; taking into account the impact of family relationships, access to resources, and security and insecurity at both the points of origin and destination.
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Jeffrey H. Cohen and Ibrahim Sirkeci

Despite the debates and an ever expanding literature, migration remains an exceptional process that has long interested scholars (Spencer 2011: 6). Yet, despite ongoing debates and improved theories, much of the research on contemporary migration continues to echo Ravenstein’s laws of migration (1889) and emphasise the economic logic of mobility. And while the economic foundation of migration and migration decision-making is a critical element if we are to understand human mobility, it is not the only or potentially the most important of drivers. There is a myriad of influences beyond jobs and wages as noted in the literature (e.g. De Jong and Graefe 2008; Fussell and Massey 2004). Humans move for many reasons, and perhaps the most important point we make in this collection is also the most simple: culture (of migration) matters. The decisions that movers make are founded in culture and social practice and over time, patterns emerge in a population’s sojourns. The patterns that come to characterise migration pathways are defined in the discussions that movers and potential movers have with their families and friends and determined by their access to resources as well as the securities and insecurities that are present at points of origin and destination (Cohen and Sirkeci 2011, 2016; Sirkeci 2009).

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Amy Carattini

The analysis presented here of highly skilled migrants (HSMs) in the US is anchored in a cultural model of migration that reveals how human dynamics are embedded in global realities. Because HSMs are categorized by geographic location of birth when they enter the US; policy makers, state organizations, and other institutions that focus on country of origin often neglect the continued movements that stratify HSMs’ careers. Based on the accepted assumption that social and cultural forces at the macro and micro levels shape individual perceptions, choices and opportunities, the focus of this research is on career trajectories that traverse changing cultures, populations, and institutional contexts.

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Edited by Philip McCann and Tim Vorley

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Edited by Jeffrey H. Cohen and Ibrahim Sirkeci

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Productivity and the Pandemic

Challenges and Insights from Covid-19

Edited by Philip McCann and Tim Vorley

This forward-thinking book examines the potential impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic on productivity. Productivity and the Pandemic features 21 chapters authored by 46 experts, examining different aspects of how the pandemic is likely to impact on the economy, society and governance in the medium- and long-term. Drawing on a range of empirical evidence, analytical arguments and new conceptual insights, the book challenges our thinking on many dimensions. With a keen focus on place, firms, production factors and institutions, the chapters highlight how the pre-existing challenges to productivity have been variously exacerbated and mitigated by the pandemic and points out ways forward for appropriate policy thinking in response to the crisis.
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Nia C. Parson

This chapter argues more attention must be paid to the aetiologies of resilience among migrants in the face of violence. I highlight the capacities of individuals and communities to thrive in the face of adversity and note that identifying aetiologies of resilience demands attention to how forms of violence are perpetuated and become embodied. Illustrating my argument with data from my research on migration and health, I show that gender-based intimate partner violence is the glue that connects various forms of violence, distress, disorder, struggle, endurance and resilience for Mexican immigrant women in the US.

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Edited by Jonathan Crush, Bruce Frayne and Gareth Haysom

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Edited by Jonathan Crush, Bruce Frayne and Gareth Haysom

The ways in which the rapid urbanization of the Global South is transforming food systems and food supply chains, and the food security of urban populations is an often neglected topic. This international group of authors addresses this profound transformation from a variety of different perspectives and disciplinary lenses, providing an important corrective to the dominant view that food insecurity is a rural problem requiring increases in agricultural production.
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Edited by Carey Curtis