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Hervé Lebret

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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Kyle K. Courtney and Emily Kilcer

The library finds itself navigating a challenging transition at the dawn of a digital era: 2013 marked the fourth consecutive year in which more than 40 percent of libraries in the United States experienced a decrease in funding. The university library is no stranger to operating under financial constraints; major university library systems at Harvard, Columbia, Chicago and more have undergone similar cuts and reorganizations. These changes are being driven in part by the new ways in which people interact with information. It is this chapter’s argument, however, that the digital age will not mark another era of decline for libraries. In fact, with the special place university libraries have traditionally held in law, policy and pedagogy, the university library is now poised to be on the forefront of the twenty-first-century digital movement as it harnesses its staff, collections and expertise to provide next-generation support for research, teaching and access. The topics in this chapter – collection development, modern library space, law and policy, open access, and collaborative case study programs – are considered as representative of some of the most critical themes for a university library to embrace in the modern era.
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Matthias Mrozewski, Agnes von Matuschka, Jan Kratzer and Gunter Festel

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Edited by Sven H. De Cleyn and Gunter Festel

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Helmut Schönenberger

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Magnus Klofsten and Erik Lundmark

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Sven H. De Cleyn and Gunter Festel

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Elco van Burg, Isabelle M.M.J. Reymen, A. Georges L. Romme and Victor A. Gilsing

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Mia L. Justesen, Rajiv V. Basaiawmoit, Flemming K. Fink and Kirstine V. Moltzen

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  • Research Handbooks in Business and Management series

Marcus Foth, Andrew Hudson-Smith and Dean Gifford

Digital transformations are not contained within the digital domain but are increasingly spilling over into the physical world. In this chapter, we analyse some of the transformations cities today are undergoing towards becoming smart cities. We offer a critique of smart cities and a way forward, divided into three parts. First, we explore the concept of Smart Citizens in terms of localities, the move towards a hyperlocal network and also the citizen’s role in the creation and use of data. We use the ‘Smart London’ plan drawn up by the Mayor of London, as a way to illustrate our discussion. Second, we turn to the civic innovations enabled by digital transformations and their potential impact on citizens and citizenship. Specifically, we are interested in the notion of social capital as an alternative form of in-kind currency and its function as an indicator of value, in order to ask how digital transformations can give rise to ‘civic capital’ and how such a concept can help, for instance, a local government invite more representative residents and community champions to participate in community engagement for better urban planning. Third, we introduce a hybrid, location-based game under development by design agency Preliminal Games in London, UK. This illustrative case critiques and highlights the current challenges to establishing a new economic model that bridges the digital–physical divide. The game provides a vehicle for us to explore how established principles and strategies in game design such as immersive storytelling and goal setting can be employed to encourage players to think of the interconnections of their hybrid digital–physical environments in new ways.