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What I have learned about teaching entrepreneurship: perspectives of five master educators

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Jerome S. Engel, Minet Schindehutte, Heidi M. Neck, Ray Smilor and Bill Rossi

In this opening chapter five highly experienced educators share insights that have been gleaned from teaching entrepreneurship for, collectively, over 60 years. Their experiences include undergraduate and graduate teaching, curricular and co-curricular development, and working with students in institutions that are private and public, small and large, and both research- and teaching-focused. They describe different teaching philosophies, styles, principles and techniques.
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What entrepreneurship educators do not understand about: creativity and how to teach it

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Jeffrey Stamp

Creativity is integral to the entrepreneurial process. Yet creativity in the entrepreneurship classroom is given scant attention because of the challenges of outcome consistency and appropriate rubrics that build credibility. This chapter reveals 10 teaching behaviors that inhibit creativity in the classroom and demonstrates 10 approaches for achieving superior creative outcomes in student entrepreneurs.
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Weighing in: reflections on a steady diet of Lean Startup

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Elissa Grossman

When entrepreneurship educators today refer to “Lean Startup,” they are often describing a real-world, customer-centric approach to early concept development and innovation that 1) begins with a search for product–market fit, 2) progresses through cycles of hypothesis testing across the various building blocks of a potential business model, and 3) reaches a provisional “end of the beginning” with a launched startup poised for rapid growth. Since the phrase was first introduced, in 2008, Lean Startup has secured global embrace – as evidenced by best-selling books on the topic, university courses and programs built around its core concepts, and a multi-year, multimillion-dollar initiative funded by the United States’ National Science Foundation. Lean Startup clearly describes an approach that is philosophically and practically aligned with much of what entrepreneurs do and entrepreneurship educators teach. That said, little is truly known about Lean Startup’s unique or differentiated ability to deliver positive business results. Further, little academic attention has been given to how Lean Startup aligns with or adds to the larger set of tools, methods, perspectives and theories, long-lived and new, that populate a truly comprehensive portfolio in entrepreneurship education. This chapter reviews the emergence of the Lean Startup approach – deconstructing its component parts in an effort to begin asking the questions that might form the basis of more robust research around Lean Startup methods and outcomes.
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Using the SEE model in entrepreneurship consulting courses and programs

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Michael H. Morris

When student teams consult to emerging or small enterprises as part of a course or field project, few tools exist to guide their efforts, particularly tools tailored to the early stage context. Based on years of working with emerging ventures, the author describes the Supporting Emerging Enterprises or SEE model as a framework for use in capturing the essence of the business, establishing priorities in terms of business needs, and determining which issues the consulting intervention will be able to address. The model is proposed for use at the front end of a student consulting engagement. The SEE model has the students move through three levels of business analysis, termed the core, internal operations and resources, and the external interface. Key issues to explore are identified for each of these three layers of analysis. A number of analytical tools are provided for capturing key processes within the business.
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University collaboration: the New Jersey state business model competition

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Susan Scherreik

This is the College Bowl meets Shark Tank: how a diverse group of 11 public and private universities in New Jersey joined forces to launch U Pitch NJ, an annual statewide business model competition. This chapter focuses on the practical steps of collaboration. U Pitch NJ raises the profile of university entrepreneurship education programs, and provides student entrepreneurs with a powerful forum for recognition.
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A unique student angel investing fund

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Sara L. Cochran

The University of Missouri developed the Allen Angel Capital Education (AACE) program to teach students the fundamentals of angel investing through a hands-on approach. AACE is an interdisciplinary, multi-level, hands-on class that performs research and invests donated assets in startup companies. The students in the program cultivate deal flow, perform pre-screening duties, complete due diligence and structure investment contracts. This course gives students a competitive edge through both developing their strategic thinking skills and facilitating high-caliber network connections outside of their own school.
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UCCS Entrepreneurial Identity Project

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Thomas N. Duening and Matthew L. Metzger

This chapter posits that entrepreneurship education will be enhanced by helping students develop a personal entrepreneurial identity. It articulates a program underway where undergraduate students engage in identity construction through a semester-long project. The project centers on internalizing four specific moral virtues posited to be central to entrepreneurial identity.
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Teaching lean: value creation (for students and faculty) in the classroom

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Doan Winkel and Jeff Vanevenhoven

Entrepreneurship faculty have long debated the most impactful means to facilitate experiential learning. Lean methodology offers a powerful framework to actively engage students in learning entrepreneurship. Launched in 2012, a teaching lean experiment has been evolving at Illinois State University (ISU) via an undergraduate three-credit entrepreneurship course. This chapter walks you through ISU’s lean methodology course.
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Teaching entrepreneurial sales skills: a co-curricular approach

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Eric Liguori, Birton Cowden and Giles Hertz

Those in entrepreneurship, as a discipline, fail to properly equip graduates with the sales acumen necessary for entrepreneurial success. While the critical importance of selling is widely accepted by entrepreneurship educators, it is reasonable to infer that less than 5 percent of entrepreneurship majors are ever exposed to any formal sales training. An Entrepreneurial Sales Skills Bootcamp (SOLD) was established in 2013 to address this deficiency. This chapter explains the nuts and bolts of the SOLD curriculum.
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Teaching entrepreneurial foresight

  • Annals in Entrepreneurship Education series

Sam Miller

One of the challenges of teaching entrepreneurship is the modest, incremental nature of student ideas. Discovery of truly transformative ideas is the brass ring for which aspiring founders strive, yet students struggle to imagine these novel ideas. This chapter demonstrates how entrepreneurial foresight can amplify the idea discovery process, enabling students to spot emerging opportunities and pursue breakthrough innovations that others may overlook.