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Dirk Lindebaum

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Dirk Lindebaum

This introductory chapter articulates both the theoretical and practical relevance of examining the interface between critical theory – with its aim to emancipate – and emotion regulation. It demonstrates the synergistic potential of combining relevant literatures to better understand why emotions should be regulated one way rather than another toward worker emancipation. Boundary conditions and clarifications are offered to clearly delineate the theorizing in the book, especially in relation to the emotions of interest in this (namely, shame, guilt, happiness and anger).

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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter lays out how the social functions of emotion, or deviations from it, can be co-opted to serve as a means of social control. The term ‘emotion’ is defined consistent with the key construct emotion regulation and the notion of emancipation as featured in critical theory. The literature on the functions of emotion is also discussed, as well as how these functions manifest themselves across levels of analysis. These steps permit introducing the reader to two pathways of social control. This chapter features a range of vignettes to contextualize how each emotion in question can be used to control behaviour in organizations. Finally, the chapter joins these insights with the literature on critical theory to maintain that the social functions of emotion constitute a sophisticated system of repression, the seeing through of which can potentially spark within repressed workers a desire to emancipate themselves from these conditions.

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Dirk Lindebaum

Emotion is often used by organisations to manipulate and repress workers. However, this repression can have adverse psychological and social consequences for them. This book articulates the pathways through which this repression occurs, and offers emotion regulation as a tool for workers to emancipate themselves from this repression and social control.
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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter outlines the theoretical and empirical findings associated with Gross’s widely used process model of emotion regulation. Building upon this, the chapter proceeds to explore specific emotion regulation strategies in order to show how they differentially apply to, and impact on, the two pathways to social control introduced in Chapter 2. Through detailed description, the chapter lays out what the current appraisal might look like for each emotion of interest in this book (shame, guilt, happiness, anger), which, in turn, gives rise to adverse psychological, physiological and social consequences. This is followed by suggestions as to how these emotions might be regulated differently (compared to the status quo) to alleviate these adverse consequences. However, consistent with the clarifications offered in Chapter 1, the author refrains from predicting what the ‘new’ consequences for workers might be – other than suggesting a lower likelihood of adverse consequences materializing if workers adopted these suggestions.

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Dirk Lindebaum

This chapter offers a comprehensive synthesis of the preceding chapters. It does so by mapping out the entire process of how each pathway to social control, with its unique characteristics, relates to specific emotions. Through a different approach to emotion regulation, the author suggests that this can eventually raise the possibility of a critical mass emerging for what is described as micro-emancipation of workers. However, the author emphasizes that it is the sense-making processes of workers that will eventually influence whether an effect will occur and, more importantly, how the effect manifests itself in the phenomenological world of workers.

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Dirk Lindebaum

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Dirk Lindebaum

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Marco Berti

The use of metaphors is presented as a heuristic device to present and to reflect on the multiple issues surrounding discourse analysis. The nature of metaphors (and similar tropes) and their functions are discussed, with particular reference to the use of metaphors in management and organizational studies, showing that they can better deploy their potential in the context of an abductive epistemological framework. Finally, three ‘images’ of discourse are introduced, with the purpose of both illustrating and enabling the emergence of new knowledge and meaning: organizational discourse as a map, as organizing, and as a mask. Key words: metaphors, tropes, disciplined imagination, abduction
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Marco Berti

This final chapter provides a concrete exemplification of the application of organizational discourse analysis, in which the heuristic potential of the approach is employed to critically describe a complex interorganizational field of practices that underlies the global institution of business education. The discussion, based on a critical survey of the vast literature on management education, is summarized in the form of a map of the contrasting life worlds that, potentially, can emerge from different configurations of ideological and social forces characterizing the field of management studies and education. Key words: business education, business schools, publishing game, ranking and accreditation, interdisciplinarity