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What sanctions? General presentation

Perspectives for Sustainable Corporate Governance

Catherine Malecki

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General introduction

Perspectives for Sustainable Corporate Governance

Catherine Malecki

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Corporate Social Responsibility

Perspectives for Sustainable Corporate Governance

Catherine Malecki

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is setting new missions for companies and shining a welcome light on issues such as the behaviour of board members, shared value, the well-being of stakeholders, the protection of vulnerable individuals and the roles played by public opinion and shareholders. This timely book seeks to lay the foundations for a sustainable corporate governance based on the European Commission definition of CSR as ‘the responsibility of enterprises for their impacts on society’. More generally, this sustainable corporate governance responds to some of the pressing challenges of the 21st century, from sustainable finance and climate change to carbon reduction and population growth.
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Conclusion

Perspectives for Sustainable Corporate Governance

Catherine Malecki

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Behaviours

Perspectives for Sustainable Corporate Governance

Catherine Malecki

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Heather Stewart and Rod Gapp

This chapter provides an understanding of the imbedding of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), through continual learning achieved by organizational development processes. Through an interpretivist case study, we investigated the collaborative relationships of 10 Australian organizations. Benefits of these relationships are reflected in improved returns, increased efficiencies, and enhanced stakeholder relationships. From these benefits, improved problem solving, change intervention, and implementation were evidenced, and supported a causal relationship between positive collaboration and mutual learning. The metaphor of a tree, the ‘collaborative ecosystem model’ is used to explain these relationships and the developmental stages explored; from seed to sprouting of the tree is depicted in terms of theory, corresponding action, and behaviours.

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David Littlewood and Diane Holt

The phenomenon of social entrepreneurship has proliferated in recent times. Concurrently, scholarly interest in and work examining social entrepreneurship has also blossomed. Yet there remains much about social entrepreneurship that we still do not know, whilst authors continue to highlight limitations in the state of theory development within the field of social entrepreneurship research. This chapter contributes towards advancing social entrepreneurship scholarship, and addressing these limitations, by exploring the insights, application and value of corporate social responsibility (CSR) theory for social entrepreneurship research. To do this, two key CSR theories: stakeholder theory and Carroll’s CSR pyramid, are analysed. We consider how both theories need to be adapted for a social enterprise context, before presenting a revised stakeholder theory of the social enterprise, and introducing the social enterprise responsibility pyramid. Although discussions in this chapter are principally conceptual, illustrative supporting examples are drawn from case study research with small and medium sized social enterprises in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Burcin Hatipoglu

Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have an important role in achieving sustainability aims throughout the supply chain management. SME characteristics and SME sustainability behaviour are different from those of large organizations, yet sustainability in supply chains is most often studied from the point of view of large organizations. This chapter challenges the current understanding of SME sustainability performance by considering in detail buyer organization demands, together with contextual factors that transform SME resources and capabilities during the phases of sustainability implementation. In order to provide a more comprehensive view of supplier SME sustainability performance, it is useful to utilize complementary theories from different disciplines. This chapter, which is conceptual in nature, contributes to the literature by providing a framework for emerging country contexts. The SME resources and capabilities for sustainability performance framework can be used to build an analytical basis for empirical research to close the gap between current sustainable supply chain management practices and theoretical explanations, with a particular focus on supplier SMEs. Managerial implications of this framework are discussed in the final section of the chapter.

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Diego Vazquez-Brust and Laura J. Spence

Going beyond research on corporate social responsibility and sustainability issues in global supply chains, this chapter takes a practical look at how small business social responsibility and sustainability issues can be meaningfully measured, especially from the perspective of small- and medium-sized enterprises. Taking a particular focus on the environmental aspects of social responsibility and sustainability, the chapter provides guidance in terms of principles of environmental performance measurement and offers a general overview of two outstanding sustainable supply chain assessment tools. Our empirically based illustrative case suggests that metrics for waste management in small British companies are likely to provide better information about quality of waste management and its impact when they are: collected by stream of waste identifying total weight and waste management solution; and analysed using relative, context-based and impact-weighted indicators.

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Edited by Laura J. Spence, Jedrzej G. Frynas, Judy N. Muthuri and Jyoti Navare

The vast majority of businesses globally are small. If business is to be socially responsible, we need to go beyond the westernised concept of 'Corporate Social Responsibility', to develop 'Small Business Social Responsibility'. This agenda-setting Research Handbook on Small Business Social Responsibility includes leading research from around the world, including developed and developing country contexts. It provides a foundation for the further development of small business social responsibility as a scholarly subject and crucially important practice and policy field.