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Ulrike Guelich and Siri Roland Xavier

This study examines the inherent challenges that women entrepreneurs face within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. We provide cross-country comparisons as well as comparisons with global benchmarks. Heterogeneous contexts result in the need for focused solutions, which provide more effective policy-making strategies to support the different ecosystems for economic growth of women entrepreneurs. In addition, we strive to put forward recommendations based on global practices or benchmarks but modified to reflect ASEAN’s regional values, stemming from family, religion and embedded traditions.

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Colette Henry, Barbara Orser, Susan Coleman, Lene Foss and Friederike Welter

Public policy is a key element within the entrepreneurial ecosystem in that policy has the potential to shape venture creation behavior and entrepreneurial outcomes. In response to studies documenting a gender gap in entrepreneurial activity, government attention to women’s entrepreneurship has increased in the past two decades. Nevertheless, there are few cross-cultural studies to inform policy development. This 13-nation study draws on gender and institutional theory to report on the status of female-focused SME/entrepreneurship policies and to ask: How — and to what extent — do women’s entrepreneurship policies differ among countries? A common methodological approach is used to identify gaps in the policy-practice nexus, highlighting countries where policy is weak but practice is strong and vice versa. Recommendations for future research are advanced.

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Daniela Giménez, Patricia Gabaldón and Cathrine Seierstad

Drawing on a gender-aware framework and institutional theory, this chapter explores the formal institutional factors (economic, anti-discrimination legislation and family policies) which affect women entrepreneurs in Latin America and the Caribbean countries. Using the 2014 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor and Women, Business, and the Law data from IFC-World Bank from 14 Latin American countries, the results indicate that economic and institutional factors affect women’s entrepreneurial activity in the region. While economic and institutional factors affect men and women entrepreneurs, the nature of these structures creates some gender-based variations. Interestingly, they influence to a great extent the nature and magnitude of women’s entrepreneurial activity. Our results provide a deeper understanding of the role of formal institutional factors on women entrepreneurs in a developing region, such as Latin America and the Caribbean.

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Colin Jones and Gimme Walter

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Colin Jones and Gimme Walter

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Ahmed Alshumaimri, Taylor Aldridge and David B. Audretsch

This paper explains why and how a technology transfer revolution is taking place in Saudi Arabia to meet the mandate that Saudi Arabia become globally competitive as a knowledge-based innovative economy. The paper explains and identifies the new policies and institutions that have been introduced and developed to facilitate technology transfer and knowledge spillovers from the universities for commercialization and ultimately innovative activity and economic growth.

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University sustainability reporting: A review of the literature and development of a model

In Search of a Multidisciplinary, Innovative and Integrated Approach

Alan J. Richardson and Meghan D. Kachler

Many universities have made a commitment to improving the sustainability of their campuses. However, only a small number report to stakeholders on their sustainability performance to allow accountability, and the quality of the reports issued varies widely. This chapter reviews studies of sustainability reporting by universities and identifies the factors that have been associated with the decision to report on sustainability and the quality of those reports. Most of the existing empirical work on sustainability reporting by universities is case-based. We critique this literature and identify areas in need of conceptual and empirical clarification. We provide a model, hypotheses, constructs, and proxies to support large-sample research on sustainability reporting by universities.

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David B. Audretsch, Erik E. Lehmann and Susanne Warning

This paper examines the impact of locational choice as a firm srategy to access knowledge spillovers from universities. Based on a large dataset of publicly listed, high-technolgy startup firms in Germany, we test the proposition that proximity to the university is shaped by different spillover mechanisms—research and human capital—and by different types of knowledge spillovers—natural scienes and social sciences.

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University experiential learning partnerships as living laboratories for sustainability

In Search of a Multidisciplinary, Innovative and Integrated Approach

Adam Sulkowski

This chapter answers the question: how can universities partner with other institutions to create experimental experiential learning partnerships, and what are the benefits of such arrangements? The author describes a model for such cooperative relationships. Based on experiences implementing municipal sustainability reporting with student teams, the author also offers both specific and generalized guidance for replicating his collaboration with municipalities. The author shares positive outcomes and concludes that the experiential learning partnerships have a key role to play as living laboratories – advancing the state of knowledge of practices that have yet to enter the mainstream and have potential to help organizations achieve sustainability.

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Bronwyn H. Hall, Albert N. Link and John T. Scott

Universities are a key institution in the U.S. innovation system, and an important aspect of their involvment is the role they play in public-private partnerships. This note offers insights into the performance of industry-university research partnerships, using a survey of precommercial research projects funded by the Advanced Technology Program.