The chapter provides an introduction to the book. It characterizes the theoretical framework, the focus of the book, and its contribution, as well as the data and methods used. Additionally, it presents a short overview of all the chapters.

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  • Gebel, M. (2020). Young women’s transition from education to work in the Caucasus and Central Asia. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 688(1), 137–154.

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  • Hvinden, B., Hyggen, C., Schoyen, M. A., & Sirovátka, T. (2019a). Youth unemployment and job insecurity in Europe: Problems, risk factors and policies. Edward Elgar Publishing.

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