Chapter 1: Technology leapfrogging in Sub-Saharan Africa: jumping the management capabilities gap
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Sub-Saharan Africa is poised for growth, with large, dynamic populations in many of its economies. Technological and business advances in the rest of the world are available to African entrepreneurs to leapfrog past previous stages of business development. As governments attempt to clear various institutional and other hurdles to growth, they should not overlook the need to build and support the managerial capabilities of private firms. This chapter briefly reviews the leading strategic management framework, known as dynamic capabilities. It then summarizes the literature on management in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the current state of management education and support for entrepreneurs. We conclude by suggesting a set of generic interventions that can be adapted to local conditions: (1) support the development of firm-level dynamic capabilities; (2) reimagine how business school education is designed and delivered; (3) build learning and mentoring networks, including international connectivity opportunities for firms; and (4) encourage further research on fostering high-growth firms able to take advantage of leapfrogging technologies.

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