Child support systems vary across countries by way of technical procedures, enforcement, and underlying purposes. The payment of child support can influence the financial wellbeing of separated parents, particularly mothers, and their children. In this chapter, international perspectives are compared through the chronology of access to each child support system, to the calculation of payment amounts, through to the collection of payments, and finally, their enforcement. This chapter does not critique each system but offers a way of understanding its distinctiveness, shared purposes, and technical procedures. It describes how the features of national child support systems differ or are constant across countries, and how they underpin each country’s current struggles with how to resource children living apart from one parent.

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