Chapter 1: Introduction to A Research Agenda for Digital Geographies
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Framing the edited volume A Research Agenda for Digital Geographies, this chapter explores the state of play for digital geographies and suggests future research agendas digital geographers can move into. This collection pushes the ongoing ideas in digital geographies further by grounding abstract ideas into case studies of how the digital manifests, shapes and is reshaped by the world around us. The chapter explores the four key topics of the book: digital margins, digital spacemaking, digital methodologies, and digital infrastructures and technologies. The contributions made by emerging and established digital geographers whose work collectively advances theoretical, methodological, and ethical realms in understanding the digital. The volume is another step in the evolution and progression of digital geographies, which will continue to be critically engaged with the role played the digital plays in our societies.

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