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Silvia Pignata

This international collection of research on stress and well-being reflects worldwide interest within the public sector. Authors of the 20 chapters are international experts in various fields, including work and organizational psychology, management, personnel and health psychology, occupational health and safety management, public health, policing, and clinical nursing practice. The Handbook utilizes empirical research, literature reviews and case studies to draw attention to the challenges of public sector environments and organizational change efforts. The collection also highlights successful practices that aim to enhance the health and well-being of workers, as well as the sector’s performance and contribution to society.

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Silvia Pignata

In Australian universities, increasing levels of job-related stress and high workloads can affect employees’ health and well-being and are likely to have direct consequences on recruiting and retaining high-quality academics, the teaching of future professionals, and the university sector’s growth in national and international markets. As theory and evidence regarding investigations of job stress in universities is incomplete in several ways, this chapter details the results of longitudinal and cross-sectional research on job stress and well-being, and reports on organizational and individual interventions to address job stress. The implications of this research are presented and several avenues for future research are highlighted. Well-being initiatives taken by both management and employees are of interest to the community as well as governments, union groups, and employers in both public and private sectors.

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Tessa S. Bailey, Silvia Pignata and Maureen F. Dollard

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Tony Pooley, Silvia Pignata and Maureen F. Dollard

The concept of human factors in mining safety was recognized in the silver mines near Athens in Ancient Greece when the state took the rare step of issuing health and safety regulations forbidding the removal of support poles and the generation of excessive smoke from oil lamps, even though it was a slave workforce. Few would argue that after more than 3000 years of increasing contemplation and research, we are still short of translating our growing knowledge into optimizing safe human performance in the workplace. This chapter provides evidence that the psychosocial safety climate for worker psychological health and safety should be viewed as the overall job-stress leading indicator (which is greater than the sum of its parts) to identify more insightful incident investigation findings in mining disasters and, consequently, provide direct recommendations towards ensuring that people managing and operating mine sites are working in a safe context.