You are looking at 11 - 20 of 31 items

  • Author or Editor: Daniele Ietri x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Attracting a specific social cohort

Architecture and Urban Competitiveness

Peter K. Kresl and Daniele Ietri

There are several population cohorts that have positive consequences for the vitality and competitiveness of an urban region. Wealthy financial and corporate individuals bring their wealth and spending power and help to create city environments that are attractive to tourists and shoppers. Typically the cities that seek them create living environments that are congenial to them. Other cities have targeted younger workers, many with families, who are seeking an attractive place to work and to raise their children. They tend to be high tech workers with specific needs for culture, recreation and other amenities. Cities that create urban environments that they find congenial are successful; those that do not may stagnate. Rapid transit, parks, green buildings, cycle paths, pedestrian ways, entertainment districts, cultural districts with museums, performance centers and theaters, and playing fields are among the architectural features that are attractive to this younger workforce.

You do not have access to this content

Creating community

Architecture and Urban Competitiveness

Peter K. Kresl and Daniele Ietri

In this chapter we discuss how cities used architecture to create community among many individuals sharing the same urban context but frequently not related by family or background and origin, as would be more frequent in rural communities. The chapter starts with a discussion of two projects designed during the first wave of industrialization and urbanization. Architectural interventions in residential areas were largely intended to provide decent housing and socialization for a growing urban lower class. In these years, the prewar utopist ideals of architecture, planning and community were frequently associated with the construction of mega-structures. Examining examples from the postwar period, we see the emergence of two aspects that are still relevant for contemporary architecture: first, large size, as we will see with the mega-buildings in many residential peripheries; second, the emergence of “archistars,” as the large interventions were frequently ideated and led by famous personalities.

You do not have access to this content

Peter K. Kresl and Daniele Ietri

Successful architectural city planning initiatives usually incorporate a set of features such as those we list at the outset of this chapter. Not all cities manage to implement these or other similar features, and their initiative usually comes up short. We examine four such examples in this chapter. In Syracuse, the city leaders lacked the foresight to implement the plan to reconfigure the center of the city. In Detroit, the RenCen was not sufficient, by itself, to revitalize the downtown area, let alone the entire city. The St. Louis Gateway Arch was abandoned by city development that drew activity to the other, western, side of the city. And Rotterdam failed to incorporate into its design the urban life preferences of the residents. In each case, time, resources and opportunities were wasted.

You do not have access to this content

Some observations and conclusions

Architecture and Urban Competitiveness

Peter K. Kresl and Daniele Ietri

This content is available to you

Daniele Ietri and Peter Karl Kresl

You do not have access to this content

European Cities and Global Competitiveness

Strategies for Improving Performance

Edited by Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri

The volume begins with an Introduction, followed by a set of three papers in Part Two examining European urban competitiveness from the standpoints of measurement and policy. This section also provides a case study of the cities of one country – Italy – from which the reader can gain an understanding of the current position of European cities as well as what might be possible going forward. Experience has shown that perhaps the most crucial element in competitiveness enhancement is good and effective governance. To that end, Part Three examines structural aspects of urban government, including polycentric regions, wide metropolitan cooperation, the role of social actors and territorial aggregation. Part Four treats issues of innovation from two perspectives and provides a case study from Eindhoven, while also covering social issues such as demographics, participation, social exclusion and mobility.
This content is available to you

Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri

This content is available to you

Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri

This content is available to you

Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri

You do not have access to this content

Peter Karl Kresl and Daniele Ietri