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Heidi M. Neck, Patricia G. Greene and Candida G. Brush

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Heidi M. Neck, Patricia G. Greene and Candida G. Brush

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Heidi M. Neck, Patricia G. Greene and Candida G. Brush

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Teaching Entrepreneurship

A Practice-Based Approach

Heidi M. Neck, Patricia G. Greene and Candida G. Brush

Teaching Entrepreneurship moves entrepreneurship education from the traditional process view to a practice-based approach and advocates teaching entrepreneurship using a portfolio of practices, which includes play, empathy, creation, experimentation, and reflection. Together these practices help students develop the competency to think and act entrepreneurially in order to create, find, and exploit opportunities of all kinds in a continuously changing and uncertain world. Divided into two parts, the book is written for those educators who want their students to develop a bias for action and who are willing to explore new approaches in their own classrooms. A set of 42 exercises with detailed teaching notes is also included to help educators effectively teach the practices in their curriculum.
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Friederike Welter, Candida Brush and Anne de Bruin

The paper builds on the understanding of context as suggested by Welter (2011) who introduced different dimensions of context along a continuum of where entrepreneurship takes place and when this happens. Where context has been studied in relation to gender and women, the focus has been on the influence of social contexts such as networks, family and household embeddedness of women entrepreneurs or the institutional environment for women’s entrepreneurship. We contribute to the literature by identifying three further themes, based on a systematic literature review: how to conceptualise the spatial and institutional contexts for women’s entrepreneurship and their intersections, as informed by entrepreneurship, gender and geography studies; the paradox of empowering women and the debate around mumpreneurship. Our analysis highlights the influence of spatial-institutional contexts on entrepreneurship: Entrepreneurial behaviour is gendered because of place which itself is gendered, reflecting local institutions such as accepted gender norms which may “force” women into specific industries or business sizes. We also highlight the agency of women entrepreneurs in influencing their spatial-institutional contexts.

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Suri Terjesen, Amanda Elam and Candida G. Brush

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Candida G. Brush, Anne de Bruin and Friederike Welter

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Candida G. Brush, Linda F. Edelman and Tatiana S. Manolova

Angel investment plays a crucial role in financing growth-oriented ventures by filling the gap between informal infusions by family and friends and more formal institutional (venture capital) investment. In this chapter we are interested in women’s ability to obtain critical early-stage, angel funding. Using a ‘readiness for funding’ framework and drawing from a proprietary database of 668 firms that over a four-year period sought angel investment from the members of a prominent angel investment group located outside of Boston, MA we compare men-only top management teams to teams which are more diverse. Our findings indicate that despite being more ‘ready’ on many of our readiness indicators, diverse top management teams are not more likely to receive funding compared to their all male counterparts. This suggests that when it comes to angel financing, the effect of top management team diversity is more nuanced and intermediated. Implications are discussed.

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Bill Aulet, Andrew Hargadon, Luke Pittaway, Candida Brush and Sharon Alpi

One of the most commented on and, arguably, acclaimed, contributions of the last volume of USASBE’s Annals of Entrepreneurship Education and Pedagogy was the entry titled “What I’ve Learned About Teaching Entrepreneurship: Perspectives of Five Master Educators” authored by Jerome Engel, Minet Schindehutte, Heidi Neck, Ray Smilor, and Bill Rossi. Engel and colleagues took time to practice deep reflection on their experiences teaching entrepreneurship and then translated their learnings into deeply meaningful insights for the field to draw from. In planning this volume, the editors believed it was important to build upon this work, so we invited five new entrepreneurship educators to share what they have learned about teaching entrepreneurship. Again, we reached out to faculty members acknowledged by their peers, leading academic organizations, their institutions, and their students to be among the very best in entrepreneurship education. And again, each of these individuals has over a decade of experience in the entrepreneurship classroom and has witnessed the rapid evolution of a very dynamic discipline. In the pages that follow Bill Aulet, Andrew Hargadon, Luke Pittaway, Candida Brush, and Sharon Alpi share their reflections on decades of cumulative experience both inside and outside the classroom.

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Cristina Díaz-García, Candida G. Brush, Elizabeth J. Gatewood and Friederike Welter