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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

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Oren Bracha

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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

Dedicated to the late Henry G. Manne, this authoritative collection surveys the development of law and economics both as a scholarly field and as an educational program. Starting as a niche area, centered primarily at the University of Chicago, law and economics has grown to be the dominant field in US legal scholarship. The influential articles presented in this volume trace that development from the mid-20th century through to today, focusing on both the personalities who laid the groundwork for the field’s success and the intellectual debates that fueled its growth. Together with an original introduction by the editors, this collection is a valuable research tool for academics and students interested in the history of law and economics.
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Oren Bracha

The comprehensive Research Review includes some of the most important and influential articles published on the history of intellectual property. The seminal works compiled encompass a broad variety of specific legal fields, periods and methodological perspectives. The collection focuses on the three main subfields of intellectual property: patent, copyright and trademark law. Volume I covers patent and copyright in Britain as well as U.S. patents. Volume II discusses U.S. copyright and trademarks along with colonial and international intellectual property law. With an original introduction by the editor, this important Research Review will be of a great interest to legal historians, economic historians and anyone interested in intellectual property and its history.
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Oren Bracha

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Henry N. Butler and Jonathan Klick

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Mamdouh G. Salameh

A few experts have been projecting the advent of the post-oil era within the next fifty years. They are saying that widespread electric vehicle (EV) use could spell the end of oil. The underlying assumption is that alternatives to oil would have been fully and cheaply developed by then thus ushering the post-oil era. Hardly a day goes by without another media report about the impending demise of the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) as petroleum-powered cars and trucks are replaced by super-clean EVs. There is no doubt that global energy’s future is in renewables. Solar power along with other alternative energy sources will ultimately provide all the electricity we need, will power water desalination plants and will drive our transport. This chapter will argue that there could never be a post-oil era throughout the 21st century and far beyond because it is very doubtful that an alternative as versatile and practicable as oil, particularly in transport, could totally replace oil in the next 100 years and beyond. It will also argue that oil will continue to be used extensively in the global petrochemical industry and other industries and outlets from pharmaceuticals to plastics, aviation and computers to agriculture and also in transport. The chapter will conclude that oil will continue to reign supreme throughout the 21st century and far beyond.

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Ian Greener

This chapter explores human behaviour, taking into account what we have learned from behavioural research of the last 30 years, and so presents a framework for considering our behaviour in relation to economic and social policy that is rather different from the Enlightenment model upon which much economic and social policymaking is based. It presents us as being flawed individuals across a range of dimensions, and argues that these flaws much be taken into account in policymaking.