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Albert N. Link

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Albert N. Link

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Albert N. Link

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Albert N. Link

Public support for innovation, chiefly through government programs such as the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has had a significant impact on fostering economic growth in the US. This collection synthesizes a decade of scholarship from Albert N. Link on the subject, specifically on small, technology-based entrepreneurial firms.
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Albert N. Link

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Edited by Albert N. Link

There is growing interest in the relationship between gender and entrepreneurial activity. In this book, 37 eminent scholars from diverse academic disciplines contribute cutting-edge research that addresses, from a gender perspective, three general areas of importance: key characteristics of entrepreneurs, key performance attributes of entrepreneurial firms, and the role of financial capital in the establishment and growth of entrepreneurial firms and in their growth.
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Albert N. Link

This book is about inventions, and the genesis of the specific inventions that I will discuss have taken place in U.S. federal laboratories. The inventions discussed in this book are defined by the technology transfer mechanism known by the term invention disclosures that refers to an aspect of the tangible results from inventive ideas in a federal laboratory. In Chapter 2, the term Inventive Ideas, which are measured in terms of the number of new invention disclosures in a federal laboratory, is described over time. In Chapter 3, empirical evidence is presented that suggests that an Experiences _ Inventive Ideas paradigm has construct validity across federal agencies. In Chapter 4, a conceptual as well as empirical explanation is offered for why some agencies are more efficient in the process of creating new inventive ideas. In Chapter 5, an enhanced knowledge production function is proposed, and evidence is offered in support of the statistical significance of the relationship: Patent Applications = G (Inventive Ideas). In Chapter 6, a case study of the Patent Applications = G (Inventive Ideas) relationship using invention disclosures information from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is discussed. In Chapter 7, CRADA (cooperative research and development agreement) activities are examined. And, in Chapter 8, a brief summary of the findings presented in this book is given.

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Albert N. Link

This chapter summarizes legislative information related to technology transfers from U.S. federal laboratories. The Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 is discussed. Invention disclosures in federal laboratories, aggregated to the agency level, are described in terms of increases and decreases over the fiscal years 2003 through 2015. A proposition is set forth, namely that ideas beget ideas. The chapter concludes with a question about the observed declining trend in invention disclosures: What does it say about the effective use of federal laboratory R & D investments if over time invention disclosures, that is new inventive ideas that stem from R & D investments, have not been increasing over time?

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Albert N. Link

Observational evidence is offered in this chapter about the relationship between invention disclosures and the human capital available to scientists and researchers in federal laboratories/agencies. Human capital is measured in terms of the number of STEM employees with whom scientists and researchers work. The relationship is shown to be positive and statistically significant.

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Albert N. Link

Other resources for which the scientists and researchers in federal laboratories/agencies have access to leverage their inventive endeavors are considered. The focal resource variable is the agency’s R & D budget. Observational evidence is offered about the relationship between invention disclosures per STEM employees and R & D budgets per STEM employees. The relationship is shown to be positive and statistically significant.