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Alessandro Colombo

This chapter offers a general overview of policy-oriented research. The chapter’s main conclusion is that its effectiveness depends on the capability of recognising and (at the same time) overcoming boundaries between researchers and policymakers. The first section deals with the nature of policy analysis and the emergence of policy studies as a distinct field from political science. The second section identifies the ‘who’, i.e. the various actors who carry out policy analysis. The third section illustrates the ‘when’: using the stagist theory, it locates policy analysis within the different stages of the policy cycle. The fourth section proposes the ‘how’ of policy analysis, comparing it with fundamental research. The last section puts forward a list of ‘Ten Golden Rules’ for policy researchers.

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Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Edited by Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Edited by Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Edited by Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Edited by Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Edited by Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

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Government, Governance and Welfare Reform

Structural Changes and Subsidiarity in Italy and Britain

Edited by Alberto Brugnoli and Alessandro Colombo

This unique and original book focuses on institutional changes, welfare reforms and transformations in both Britain and Italy over the last three decades.
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Nicola Francesco Dotti and Alessandro Colombo

The final chapter summarises the main results discussed in the previous chapters and draws conclusions about the notion of research–policy dialogue. After reviewing each chapter, we argue that, first, research and policymaking should recognise their different rationales. Once they recognise these differences and mutual ‘right’ to speak, the research–policy dialogue is likely to lead to better policy outcomes through policy learning. Finally, we should recognise that this ‘dialogue’ is located ‘somewhere’, and policy learning is context-specific. For the future, we suggest questioning the notion of ‘research–policy dialogue’ for theoretical development and empirical validations as well as alternative models.