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Susan Coleman and Alicia Robb

Prior research suggests that access to financial capital, a key resource input for growth-oriented firms, may be more of a challenge for women-owned firms than for men. In this study we use data from the Kauffman Firm Survey to examine gender differences in firm growth as well as financing patterns and credit market experiences for a large sample of US firms that began operation in 2004 and were tracked from 2004 through 2011. Our findings revealed significant gender gaps in the amount of capital raised for both growth-oriented and non-growth firms, even controlling for credit risk, industry, and other firm and owner characteristics.

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Joseph Farhat and Alicia M. Robb

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Susan Coleman and Alicia Robb

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Alicia Robb and Susan Coleman

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Susan Coleman and Alicia Robb

Prior research reveals that women are less likely to launch growth-oriented firms than men. Further, when women do attempt to grow their firms, they do so with smaller amounts of financial capital, typically generated by internal rather than external sources. The gender funding gap is particularly evident in the category of external equity or capital provided by angel investors and venture capitalists, the majority of whom are men. Based on Thomas Dewey’s principles of experiential education, the Rising Tide Angel Training Program was designed to increase the number of women angel investors capable of investing in a greater number of women-owned firms. This chapter provides a description of the Rising Tide program and results from the first training cohort.

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Edited by Tatiana S. Manolova, Candida G. Brush, Linda F. Edelman, Alicia Robb and Friederike Welter

The renowned group of international contributors to this book provide analysis of where and how gender plays a role in the entrepreneurial ecosystem. 11 essays examine how ecosystems influence women entrepreneurs and how women entrepreneurs influence their local ecosystems, both cross-nationally and through in-depth country studies.
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Tatiana S. Manolova, Candida G. Brush, Linda F. Edelman, Alicia Robb and Friederike Welter

In the introductory chapter to the book we discuss the biological roots of ecosystems and recent work on the entrepreneurship ecosystem concept with a focus on gender. This is followed by a presentation of the chapters in the book and how they collectively elucidate the gendered aspects of entrepreneurial ecosystems and their impact on women entrepreneurs’ growth strategies in different regions around the world. We conclude by summarizing the major insights from this collection of studies and by suggesting some directions for future research.