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Anders Örtenblad

This chapter presents the research area and research questions and introduces the remaining chapters of the book. It is argued that while there are quite a few works on how corporate social responsibility (CSR) is practiced in various contexts, there is a need for more research on how CSR should be practiced by organizations in various generalized contexts, and, thus, that there is a need for a contingency model of CSR. A broad, general definition – based on Jeremy Moon’s work – in terms of seven aspects is introduced, and this definition is used as a common starting point for the book, in which the relevance of each aspect is examined for organizations in various generalized contexts. The chapter also presents the research questions for the book, which are to pay attention to and acknowledge the need for examining the relevance of CSR for organizations in different generalized contexts as an emerging research field, to explore the universality of CSR, to offer knowledge (as well as support for further knowledge-seeking) on how the general model of CSR needs to be adapted to become relevant to organizations within particular generalized contexts, and to begin the work on constructing a contingency model of the relevance of CSR for organizations in various generalized contexts.

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Anders Örtenblad

This chapter is the final and concluding chapter of the book. The research questions that were presented in Chapter 1 are discussed and answered. The beginning of a contingency model for corporate social responsibility (CSR) is presented on the basis of the chapters in the book that dealt with examining the relevance of the seven aspects model of CSR for organizations in various particular generalized contexts. In some cases the original CSR model (that is, all seven aspects) is fully relevant, while in other cases the model has to be somewhat adapted to fit perfectly. Thus it is concluded that CSR is an idea that is universal in a contingent (or inspirational) sense, but not in an absolute sense. Suggestions for further research are also outlined. For instance, there is a need for studies on the relevance of the seven aspects model for organizations in generalized contexts other than those dealt with in this book, to add to the contingency model. In such studies there may be reason to address different stakeholder perspectives and interests more explicitly, and a suggestion for how such studies could take place – in terms of 10 steps (‘Corporate Social Responsibility Contextualization Research Advice Instrument’ (CSR-CRAI)) – is outlined. There is also a need for further discussion about the seven aspects model of CSR and whether it is the ideal definition for studies of CSR and its relevance for organizations in various generalized contexts.

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Edited by Anders Örtenblad

Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) a universal idea? Is the same exact definition of CSR relevant for any organization, regardless of context? Or would such a definition need to be adapted to fit different types of organizations, in different cultures, industries and sectors? This book discusses how CSR preferably should be practiced in various generalized contexts. Experts share their knowledge on whether a broad definition of CSR can be practiced as is or if it first has to undergo changes, in as various generalized contexts as Buddhist and Islamic organizations, developing countries, the food processing industry, the shipping industry, and the pharmaceutical industry.
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Edited by Anders Örtenblad

This content is available to you

Edited by Anders Örtenblad

This content is available to you

Anders Örtenblad

This chapter presents the research area and research questions, and introduces the remaining chapters of the book. It is argued that the majority of the previous literature on certain management ideas and panaceas tends to either recommend that these are adopted outright or that they are rejected outright. This book instead recommends that the relevance of any certain management idea or panacea for any certain organization or organizations in a certain generalized context is tested and – in case the idea/panacea is found not to be fully relevant – adapted to fit the certain context. The aim of the book is to accomplish wiser relevance-testing and adaptation of management ideas and panaceas through advising how various groups of actors, in particular researchers, organizational actors and higher educational institutions, can take part in such processes. Some concepts that are central in the book are also tentatively defined.
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Anders Örtenblad

This chapter draws conclusions from the author’s previous as well as ongoing work in which either the relevance of a certain management idea/panacea for organizations in different generalized contexts are tested, or where the relevance of various management ideas and panaceas for organizations in one particular generalized context is tested. Thus, the chapter reports from three edited books in which the relevance of the idea of the learning organization, knowledge management and corporate social responsibility (respectively) for organizations in various generalized contexts is tested (all three books are edited by the chapter author, published by Edward Elgar Publishing), one book in which the relevance of various management ideas and panaceas for healthcare organizations is tested (co-edited by the chapter author, published by Routledge), and one article in which the relevance of the idea of the learning organization for higher educational institutions is tested (co-authored by the chapter author, published in the International Journal of Educational Management). The chapter discusses how such research/book projects should be staffed, suggests how researchers wisely can test the relevance of any certain management idea or panacea for any particular organization or organizations in any generalized context, and outlines how any particular management idea or panacea could be adapted to fit any organization or organizations in any generalized context along with how such adaptation could be illustrated.
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Anders Örtenblad

This chapter is the final and concluding chapter of the book. It starts off by suggesting that there is reason to distinguish between two variants of universality of management ideas and panaceas: absolute and contingent (or inspirational) universality. Then the main conclusion of the book is outlined; for wiser relevance-testing and adaptation of management ideas and panaceas for individual organizations or organizations in generalized contexts, there is a need for (1) diversity; (2) critical examination; and (3) transparency. The roles that researchers, organizational actors and higher education can play in accomplishing wiser relevance-testing and adaptation are also discussed. In the final section of the chapter, a few areas where there is a need for further research are suggested: there is need for (a) action research on relevance-testing and adaptation of management ideas and panaceas; (b) research on the roles of other groups of actors – such as consultants – in reaching wiser relevance-testing and adaptation; and (c) a nomenclature for the many concepts that are used in this research area and a more precise definition of the object in study (that is, ‘management ideas and panaceas’, especially as there a need for a more appropriate definition of ‘management idea’).
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Edited by Anders Örtenblad

Over time management ideas and panaceas have been presented alternately as quick fix cures for all corporate ills and the emperor’s new clothes, beset by flaws and problems. This Handbook provides a different approach, suggesting that management ideas and panaceas should not be either adopted or rejected outright, but gives guidance in the art of assessing and applying management ideas and panaceas to various situations and contexts.