You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items

  • Author or Editor: Andy Pike x
Clear All Modify Search
This content is available to you

Edited by Andy Pike

This content is available to you

Andy Pike

You do not have access to this content

Edited by Andy Pike

Despite overstated claims of their ‘global’ homogeneity, ubiquity and contribution to ‘flattening’ spatial differences, the geographies of brands and branding actually do matter. This vibrant collection provides a comprehensive reference point for the emergent area of brand and branding geographies in a multi-disciplinary and international context.
You do not have access to this content

Andy Pike

You do not have access to this content

Peter O’Brien and Andy Pike

You do not have access to this content

Andy Pike, Peter O’Brien, Tom Strickland, Graham Thrower and John Tomaney

Financialising City Statecraft and Infrastructure addresses the struggles of national and local states to fund, finance and govern urban infrastructure. It develops fresh thinking on financialisation and city statecraft to explain the socially and spatially uneven mixing of managerial, entrepreneurial and financialised city governance in austerity and limited decentralisation across England. As urban infrastructure fixes for the London global city-region risk undermining national ‘rebalancing’ efforts in the UK, city statecraft in the rest of the country is having uneasily to combine speculation, risk-taking and prospective venturing with co-ordination, planning and regulation.
This content is available to you

Andy Pike, Peter O’Brien, Tom Strickland, Graham Thrower and John Tomaney

This content is available to you

Andy Pike, Peter O’Brien, Tom Strickland, Graham Thrower and John Tomaney

Infrastructure systems provide the services we all rely upon for our everyday lives. Our relationships with infrastructures have been disturbed by increasing and more sophisticated demands, new technologies and geographical unevenness in the availability, quality and cost of urban infrastructure provision. Public concerns have raised fundamental questions about who owns, runs and pays for city infrastructure. The book aims to better understand the engagements of financialisation with city governance and infrastructure and identify its implications for urban and regional development, politics and policy. Outlining the recent rise and “crisis” of city infrastructure, it argues that understanding contemporary financialisation is critical to explain its funding, financing and governing. Understanding financialisation as a socially and spatially variegated process, national and local states are subject to as well as leading this financialising process, and it is generating wider and longer-term ramifications for development, politics and policy in cities and regions.

You do not have access to this content

Andy Pike, Peter O’Brien, Tom Strickland, Graham Thrower and John Tomaney

City infrastructure is defined and conceptualised, situating the challenge of its funding, financing and governing in historical and geographical context. Critical review of existing work on city infrastructure financialisation identifies key gaps and constructs an understanding that recognises its social, spatial and institutional composition, unevenness, constraints, and ramifications. Engagement with financialising city infrastructure governance questions frameworks based upon archetypes and historical transformations given their limitations in explaining the current episode of mixing and mutating entrepreneurial, financialised and managerial urban governance. Financialisation is distilled to identify its characteristic dimensions and a new framework is provided for interpreting the financialising of city infrastructure and governance.

You do not have access to this content

Andy Pike, Peter O’Brien, Tom Strickland, Graham Thrower and John Tomaney

A new theorisation is introduced to explain city governance and infrastructure based upon a geographical political economy conception of city statecraft. Critically reviewing Jim Bulpitt’s original statecraft ideas and their recent take-up in local, regional and urban studies, it forges a more integrated geographical, political and economic understanding, opens up the sub-national level beyond the “low politics” of local government, and focuses upon the agency of state actors across multiple geographical levels and units. City statecraft explains how distinct governing forms, practices and arrangements are mixed and mutated involving national and local state and other actors in particular temporal, spatial and institutional settings. Operationalising this approach to researching financialising city statecraft and infrastructure, the critical case of England in the UK as a lens onto wider processes in an international setting is explained and justified.