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Identity in the Age of the New Economy

Life in Temporary and Scattered Work Practices

Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

Identity in the Age of the New Economy is a multi-faceted view of contemporary employment and identity that questions a number of the myths related to the so-called new economy, knowledge society or network society. It argues that one of the most striking things about much contemporary theorizing on work and identity is the epochalist terms in which it is framed: changing forms of identity and subjectivity are assumed to be consequences of a shift to an entirely new economic, social and cultural era, signalled by concepts such as postmodernity, risk society, network society or new economy.
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Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

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Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

This content is available to you

Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

This content is available to you

Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

This content is available to you

Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

This content is available to you

Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

This content is available to you

Edited by Torben Elgaard Jensen and Ann Westenholz

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Ann Westenholz

In her contribution, Ann Westenholz explores the similarities and differences of the conventions and institutional logics perspectives in order to create a space for dialogue and mutual learning between the two approaches. Both approaches not only share a similar purpose, that is, helping us to understand indeterminacy and ambiguity, they also identify different social orders that may change over time. Both recognize that actorhood is important for the transformation of social orders, and they have both developed an understanding of how social orders and actorhood are interrelated. Despite these commonalties, the two perspectives have developed in different ways in France and the USA and not much dialogue has taken place between them until recently. Westenholz illustrates that a comparison of the two perspectives is helpful to create a common ground for analyzing and understanding how people coordinate their activities in indeterminate and ambiguous situations.

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Ann Westenholz