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Artur da Rosa Pires

The argument underlying this chapter is that academic background does influence political action and that conceptual and theoretical knowledge has a major impact on problem definition, agenda-setting and policy design. However, it further elaborates that argument, going beyond the cognitive dimension and calling the attention to the sometimes decisive role played by other skills, competencies, attitudes and even ‘global’ networks embodied in the ‘academic background’. The argument is empirically supported by a detailed presentation of a specific policy-making exercise that took place for over a year, dealing with the introduction of substantive changes on established practices in the design and focus of innovation-based regional development policy. The chapter then focus on the reconsideration of the learning–teaching process, following the return to academia, namely going beyond the emphasis on the cognitive dimensions and extending understanding to the capacity to enact transformative changes in society in the prosaic world of practice.

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Artur Da Rosa Pires and Carlos Rodrigues

This paper highlights the very influential role that Frank Moulaert played in the development of the first social sciences-based planning school in Portugal, created in the University of Aveiro in the early 1980s. The contribution of Frank, either through the now long established European Spatial Development Planning Network (ESDPN), where Frank became one of the most active participants, or through several joint research projects, was most valuable in shaping not only the planning approach but also the research ethos adopted in the planning school. The stimulus and the international recognition provided by the engagement in teaching and research activities where Frank was involved, helped to strengthen an academic culture where sensitivity to the specificities of the region, to the local community, to social justice and to action-research were not only dominant but also framed in broader and global concerns with, and approaches to, spatial policy, social change and societal challenges.

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Edited by Andrea I. Frank and Artur da Rosa Pires

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Andrea I. Frank and Artur da Rosa Pires

This chapter elaborates on the book’s rationale, aims and objectives to advance the dialogue on contemporary challenges to planning education and to explore prevailing trends and arguably transformational changes in spatial planning and its education. The context and nature of the education for urban and regional planning is reviewed as well as the manifold external factors and increasing complexities of planning tasks at the start of the 21st century. It is argued that emerging contemporary societal, demographic and environmental conditions posit ever more wicked and complex challenges which require planners to embrace novel skills, boundary-spanning knowledges and attitudes in addressing them. As such there is an urgent need for substantial changes in programme content, focus and requisite pedagogical approaches. Going beyond a mere compilation of teaching case studies the book offers also insights and viewpoints from prominent educationalist on postmodern pedagogical concepts to contextualise global innovation trends in the field of spatial planning. The book’s contributions are clustered into four themed sections: Pedagogical Debates; Teaching and Learning In, For and With Community; Developing Classroom-based New Competencies; Further Education and Life-long capacity building which are further elaborated on in this chapter. In addition, brief summaries for each contribution and its key points are offered while contextualizing the emerging transformative and transformational changes for and in education more broadly and in planning education, specifically. The chapter closes with a call for valuing new learning landscapes for both planning and educational approaches and proposing and cherishing the development of new pathways to continue the dialogue initiated with the book.

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Artur da Rosa Pires and Andrea I. Frank

The nature of spatial planning is changing in response to the challenges of an urbanizing world, growing environmental and socio-economic challenges and climate change. In this concluding chapter a set of aggregate lessons from the fifteen different contributions is developed. There are four surprisingly coherent messages that bring about transformative changes in contemporary planning education each of which are reflected in several of the contributions ranging from transdisciplinarity to the growing potential and role of planning (education) in the development of expressions of the future university. The authors also reflect on the practicalities of pedagogical change and the demands these represent and place on educators and their institutions. A second section looks at ongoing educational change through a historical lens and considers the magnitude of change and the potential impact of recent external factors such as the 2020 health pandemic. A third and final, forward-looking section, contemplates the kinds of transformative changes that are desirable and needed for an informed crafting of future planning education.

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Teaching Urban and Regional Planning

Innovative Pedagogies in Practice

Edited by Andrea I. Frank and Artur da Rosa Pires

This innovative book makes the case for training future planners in new and creative ways as coordinators, enablers and facilitators. An international range of teaching case studies offer distinctive ideas for the future of planning education along with practical tips to assist in adapting pedagogical approaches to various institutional settings. Unique contributions from educational scholars contextualise the emergent planning education approaches in contemporary pedagogical debates.
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Artur Da Rosa Pires, Carlos Rodrigues and Stuart Cameron

The ESDP network organised an Erasmus Intensive Programme (IP) almost every year between 1990 and 2014 based in a range of European countries, two or three successive years in each. These provided a multicultural learning experience, an intensive two-week studies of spatial development issues in the host city, for postgraduate students from across Europe. They worked in multi-national and multi-disciplinary groups supported by staff from universities across the network to research, report and make recommendations on these issues. The Erasmus IP was a major success among students, despite the undeniable heavy workload and the daunting challenges of harmonizing such diverse disciplinary and cultural backgrounds. Intellectually the success of the IP drew on the combination of the collaborative research and ethos of the ESDP network and the specific opportunities for learning from localities, for example the two IP events in Athens allowed a ‘before and after’ study of the impact of the Olympic Games on the city and the significance of mega-events in regeneration.