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Ayantunji Gbadamosi

Given the associated complexity, understanding consumer behavior is a herculean endeavor. This is connected to the fact that it is influenced by a myriad of factors which are also interconnected in a number of ways. Meanwhile, the role of culture and religion, among these key factors that underpin consumption are increasingly acknowledged. Hence, examining this robustly is considered essential towards extending our understanding of this phenomenon. Accordingly, this chapter provides a critical overview of this. It specifically, presents an overview of some of the common religions towards highlighting the associated beliefs. Showing this demonstrates the scale of diversity that characterized it. Moreover, driven by the need for focused contribution to the literature, the discourse on this important topic is specifically positioned to revolve around developing nations. Hence, the chapter underscores how religion and culture interplay to influence consumption in developing nations, and highlights the value of knowing this for effective marketing decisions.

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Ayantunji Gbadamosi

One of the palpable changes to consumption in recent times is the impact of the advancement of technology. It permeates virtually every phase of consumption system and consumption categories. Its diverse benefits to both the consuming and producing parties make it an issue of interest that cannot be ignored in terms of scale and significance in the contemporary marketing system. Accordingly, this chapter explores the nexus of technology and religion in the consumption pattern of developing nations. it shows improvement in the use of digital technologies in developing nations and highlights how this influences consumption in this region. The chapter shows the interrelationship of the elements of the digital marketing environment and how technology is central to this. It also acknowledges the diversity that characterized religion in developing nations, hence it shows the relevance of segmentation, targeting, and positioning in how religion and religiosity could be explored to create, co-create, and deliver value to these consumers in effective ways.

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Edited by Ayantunji Gbadamosi and Ayodele C. Oniku

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Chahid Fourali and Ayantunji Gbadamosi

Increasing evidence underscores the importance of religion as a core influencing factor in consumption. This issues underpinning this such as ethics, morals, values, and beliefs that drive consumption have enduring influence on consumption of goods and services. Accordingly, a look into the future of this dynamics emphasizes huge possibilities for marketers in terms of how religion will continue to thrive in the marketing system. While this future relevance has a very wide scope, the specific importance in developing nations is noteworthy. This chapter systematically presents this contention. it emphasizes a pivotal position of developing countries in the global marketing system and stresses that religion will continue to play crucial role in how this evolves. The chapter shows this as the common thread that links ethics, brands, and technology both at the psychological and sociological echelons of consumption in the 21st century developing nations.

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Edited by Ayantunji Gbadamosi and Ayodele C. Oniku

Examining how religion influences the dynamics of consumption in developing nations, this book illuminates the strategic placement of these nations on the global marketing stage both in terms of their current economic outlook and potential for growth.
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Nnamdi O. Madichie, Ayantunji Gbadamosi and Sonny Nwankwo

This chapter traces the growth of the SME Marketing course (in small and medium-sized organization marketing) at a London university from a miniscule six students in the first cohort enrolled on the programme in 2005/06 to more than 100 in 2011/12. Drawing upon participant observation, and action research aided with the use of in-depth interviews, the chapter highlights a considerable increase in the enrolment figures since the course launch, and thereby clearly demonstrates the popularity of the module, as well as how the university has positioned itself as an entrepreneurial entity in tune with the reality of the society. However, although the study could be seen as enlightening in some ramifications, its key limitation is in its inability to generalize the findings. Nonetheless, a slightly different perspective on the entrepreneurial university is highlighted, by focusing on how a single module launch could enhance and elevate the entrepreneurial mindsets of students.

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Ayantunji Gbadamosi, Kathy-Ann Fletcher, Kareem Sani, Roshan Panditharathna and David J. Bamber

The literature is replete with postulations around consumer decision making process. Essentially, the core argument in this issue is that Irrespective of the market offering involved, the consumer pass through a number of stages which begins with need recognition. Conventionally, this is followed by search for information, evaluation of alternatives, decision, and post-purchase evaluation. A number of scholarship efforts have provided variants of this vis-à-vis various decision models that do not necessarily conform to the rational model depicted in the highlighted process. This chapter presents a critical overview of this discourse. Moreover, in view of its all-encompassing form, the chapter offers an eclectic submission on each of the stages in this conventional process in relation to how religion reflect in them to influence consumption in developing nations. A good number of cases and illustrations are presented to accentuate this as relevant to developing nations as the contextual platform for the chapter.