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Börje Johansson

This chapter examines in which ways social and economic networks can be a part of social capital, and to what extent social capital can be understood as a resource for organizing economic networks. It is recognized that social capital is a spatial public good with geographic extension. This suggests that social capital is intangible and benefits certain groups of actors who are associated with spatial areas for which the social capital is present. The extension of social capital can be identified on a scale ranging from community culture to system-wide institutions. A major part of the analysis focuses on how economic and social networks differ in nature and motivation, observing that economic links often lack a public-good nature, for example by excluding competitors. There is also a comparison between the concepts of social capital and social infrastructure. The analysis suggests that future research should consider the following three areas: (1) social and societal capital; (2) exclusion, interaction and sharing; and (3) accessibility and agglomeration economies.

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Börje Johansson and Thomas Paulsson

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Charlie Karlsson and Börje Johansson

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Börje Johansson and Desirée Nilsson

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Börje Johansson and Charlie Karlsson

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Börje Johansson and Johan Klaesson

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Börje Johansson and Ulla Forslund

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Börje Johansson and Hans Lööf

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Peter Warda and Börje Johansson

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Åke E. Andersson and Börje Johansson

This chapter addresses the role of knowledge in regional development. Knowledge is a multidimensional concept that includes private knowledge embodied in an individual’s brain (human capital); technical advances embodied in computers, machinery and other production equipment; knowledge embodied in production recipes, patenting documents or computer software; and public knowledge in scientific journals. For the individual firm, innovation is driven by the conjunction of its knowledge arising from internal research and external knowledge. The dynamic interactions of these different representations of knowledge is a complicated process. The chapter presents a conceptual framework for identifying interaction processes in the global system of knowledge creation and exploitation, as well as formal models of economic theory, to draw conclusions about characteristics of the knowledge economy including the emergence of some places as knowledge centres and the decline of other research-poor peripheral regions.