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Debmalya Mukherjee and Ben L. Kedia

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Edited by Ben L. Kedia and Kelly Aceto

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Edited by Ben L. Kedia and Kelly Aceto

After a decade of unprecedented growth, the BRIC nations’ economies have unexpectedly slowed. In this innovative book, expert contributors diagnose and examine the factors that might be responsible for the economic regression in Brazil, Russia, India, and China.
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Edited by Ben L. Kedia and Subhash C. Jain

Though we live in an era of rapid innovation, the United States has introduced comparatively few commercial innovations within the past decade. Innovation shortfall contributes to weaker trade performance, decreased productivity growth, lower wages and many other economic woes. This study provides insightful recommendations for developing enhanced innovation efforts that could help foster substantial, long-term economic growth.
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Edited by Ben L. Kedia and Subhash C. Jain

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Ben L. Kedia and Scott E. Mooty

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Subhash C. Jain and Ben L. Kedia

This book traces the history of India’s progress since its independence in 1947 and advances strategies for continuing economic growth. Insiders and outsiders that have criticized India for slow economic growth fail to recognize all it has achieved in the last seven decades, including handling the migration of over 8 million people from Pakistan, integrating over 600 princely states into the union, managing a multi-language population into one nation and resolving the food problem. The end result is a democratic country with a strong institutional foundation. Following the growth strategies outlined in the book and with a strong leadership, India has the potential to stand out as the third largest economy in the world in the next 25 to 30 years.
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Subhash C. Jain and Ben L. Kedia

After independence, India had to promptly resolve three issues. First was the identity of the country, that is, what is India? Unlike other nations, India could not be identified by a religion or a language since its people belonged to different religions, spoke different languages and belonged to different castes. The leaders settled with the title Republic of India to encompass all people despite diversity. The second problem was the relocation of more than 8 million people who migrated from Pakistan. The third concern was the integration of more than 600 princely states into the Republic of India. Difficult as they were, all these challenges were successfully addressed and resolved.

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Subhash C. Jain and Ben L. Kedia

In 1950, after three years of independence, India became a constitutional democracy. The Constitution abolished untouchability, the centuries-old lingering issue. At the same time, while Hindi was identified as the national language, for the unity of the country, for 15 years English was accorded the same status to facilitate communication between non-Hindi-speaking states/people and those who spoke Hindi. Finally, following the Constitution, the first free election was held in 1952, a remarkable feat for a country without any prior experience in the matter. After five years, the second election was held in 1957, establishing the tradition of a vibrant democracy for the future.

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Subhash C. Jain and Ben L. Kedia

Political pundits and intellectuals, both in India and elsewhere, wondered if India could survive as a democracy given its huge diversity. But despite the challenges, it did. The chapter pinpoints major aspects of India’s success. Firstly, leaders who fought for India’s freedom continued to be active for a long time in post-independent India establishing a strong foundation for a democratic society with an appropriate institutional framework. Other factors include pluralism of religion, linguistic organization of states, administrative setup of the government through the selection of intelligent and capable individuals who kept the army away from politics, Hindi cinema and Bollywood movies which people enjoyed immensely throughout India, free mobility of people throughout the country, emerging communications technology and a common passion by Indians for the game of cricket. They have all been instrumental in maintaining the unity of the country.