You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items

  • Author or Editor: Benjamin J. Richardson x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Local Climate Change Law

Environmental Regulation in Cities and Other Localities

Edited by Benjamin J. Richardson

This timely study offers a multi-jurisdictional perspective, featuring international contributors who examine both theoretical and practical dimensions of how localities are addressing climate mitigation and adaptation in Australia, Canada, China, Europe, South Africa and the United States, as well as considering the place of localities in global climate law agreements and transnational networks.
You do not have access to this content

Benjamin J. Richardson

You do not have access to this content

Benjamin J. Richardson

The financial sector influences the environmental performance of the economy, often in harmful ways. Through the global movement for socially responsible investing (SRI), the influence of financial institutions is being reoriented in a more positive direction.  Their pathways of influence, such as divestment, corporate engagement, impact investing and voluntary codes of conduct, give modest leverage over the environmental activities of the companies supported by the financial sector. The SRI sector has yet to address the systemic and structural features of the financial economy, as against merely the environmental or social behaviour of individual investors or companies. Social investors should also target government regulators and international lawmakers to introduce better environmental laws, such as a carbon tax, and should also lobby for law reform to improve the regulatory milieu for SRI itself, such as by overhauling fiduciary and trusts law that at present can impede action by some institutional investors.

You do not have access to this content

Benjamin J. Richardson

Is fossil fuels divestment likely to achieve its aims? This chapter evaluates the rationales of divestment for their capacity to give the global divestment campaign influence in the marketplace. In seeking to end fossil fuel industries in order to mitigate climate change, the campaign deploys a variety of arguments to win support and wield influence in the market, namely: the legality and indeed emerging duty to divest; investors’ moral responsibility to avoid complicity in the fossil fuel economy; their moral responsibility to use their leverage against climate polluters; and the power of financial sanctions to create a business case for abandoning fossil fuels. Each of these asserted rationales has some limitations that may diminish the market influence of the divestment movement, although in combination they may be effective. Yet, the movement does not engage sufficiently with the systemic qualities of finance capitalism that must also be reckoned with in order to address broader pressures for environmentally unsustainable development. The divestment movement may achieve greater influence by seeking also to reform government regulation of the financial economy.

You do not have access to this content

Benjamin J. Richardson

Global environmental governance has important aesthetic dimensions frequently overlooked in our preoccupation with the scientific, economic or ethical criteria that dominate policy making in this field. Environmental aesthetics are vital in shaping people’s emotional empathy for nature and building a ‘sense of place’ or cultural connection to landscapes. However, the spatial and temporal mutations associated with the Anthropocene, notably the dissemination of anthropogenic environmental impacts across enlarged timescales and geographies unlike historic environmental change, are not easily recognizable by most people. The arts can help to mediate how people understand the changing aesthetics of the Anthropocene. In recent years, artists from many parts of the world have emerged as an important new stakeholder in the green activist space, using visual and performance arts, and music, to critique prevailing environmental practices, such as those associated with the fossil fuels economy, and to use art as means for advocating political and legal changes to respond to these problems. This chapter evaluates the goals, methods and influence of green activist art, such as used by the Extinction Rebellion movement, in transnational environmental governance.

You do not have access to this content

Benjamin J. Richardson

Covid-19 has dominated global news in 2020, but even the pandemic has not stymied a new generation of activists mobilizing for action on interconnected grievances of climate breakdown, economic inequality and social injustice.

You do not have access to this content

From Student Strikes to the Extinction Rebellion

New Protest Movements Shaping our Future

Edited by Benjamin J. Richardson

Across the world, millions of people are taking to the streets demanding urgent action on climate breakdown and other environmental emergencies. Extinction Rebellion, Fridays for Future and Climate Strikes are part of a new lexicon of environmental protest advocating civil disobedience to leverage change. This groundbreaking book – also a Special Issue of the Journal of Human Rights and the Environment – critically unveils the legal and political context of this new wave of eco-activisms. It illustrates how the practise of dissent builds on a long tradition of grassroots activism, such as the Anti-Nuclear movement, but brings into focus new participants, such as school children, and new distinctive aesthetic tactics, such as the mass ‘die-ins’ and ‘discobedience’ theatrics in public spaces.