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Bruno de Witte

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Monica Claes and Bruno de Witte

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Edited by Bruno De Witte, Andrea Ott and Ellen Vos

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Bruno De Witte, Andrea Ott and Ellen Vos

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Between Flexibility and Disintegration

The Trajectory of Differentiation in EU Law

Edited by Bruno De Witte, Andrea Ott and Ellen Vos

Differentiation was at first not perceived as a threat to the European project, but rather as a tool to promote further integration. Today, more EU policies than ever are marked by concentric circles of integration and a lack of uniform application. As the EU faces increasingly existential challenges, this timely book considers whether the proliferation of mechanisms of flexibility has contributed to this newly fragile state or whether, to the contrary, differentiation has been fundamental to integration despite the heterogeneity of national interests and priorities.
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Edited by Mark Dawson, Bruno De Witte and Elise Muir

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Elise Muir, Mark Dawson and Bruno de Witte

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Edited by Mark Dawson, Bruno De Witte and Elise Muir

Detailed chapters from academics, practitioners and stakeholders bring diverse perspectives on a range of factors – from access rules to institutional design and to substantive functions – influencing the European Court’s political role. Each of the contributing authors invites the reader to approach the debate on the role of the Court in terms of a constantly evolving set of interactions between the EU judiciary, the European and national political spheres, as well as a multitude of other actors vested in competing legitimacy claims. The book questions the political role of the Court as much as it stresses the opportunities – and corresponding responsibilities – that the Court’s case law offers to independent observers, political institutions and civil society organisations.