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Adam Lindgreen and C. Anthony Di Benedetto

The academic’s tasks are usually succinctly described as research, teaching, and service. To be successful in one’s career, each of these must be kept in balance, and prioritized correctly. This is challenging, as the tasks usually are running in parallel, all are time demanding, and any one task can become overwhelming as deadlines approach. We first take a deeper look at the various tasks that must be balanced by the academic. Following that discussion, we provide a series of suggestions for how junior academics can become good at prioritization and other skills that help them achieve the desired balance between the tasks of research, teaching, and service, and between work and personal life.

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Adam Lindgreen and C. Anthony Di Benedetto

Throughout this book, we have presented a wide range of responsibilities of the business academic: generating ideas, working with Ph.D. students, obtaining research funding, getting published, crossing boundaries and forming alliances with other functional areas and with industry, and making valid societal contributions - all while balancing personal and professional lives. We have attempted to present insights that will be helpful to early and mid-career academics in order to fast-track their career. While we have specifically taken the perspective of the business-to-business marketing academic, we believe that many of the insights will be valuable to academics in any business school department. We conclude with a few final thoughts on several of the key topics we have addressed in previous chapters.

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Ebru Genç and C. Anthony Di Benedetto

Massive growth in attention to sustainability and calls for firms to be more considerate of their impact on the environment lead a growing number of firms to consider stewardship of the natural environment as a core part of their corporate agendas. Sustainable new product development (SNPD) requires the integration of sustainability issues into the product development process in a profitable way. Many new products, such as low emission vehicles and energy-saving appliances, are now launched with a primary emphasis on sustainability-related attributes. This chapter discusses SNPD and its roots in corporate environmentalism, its manifestation as a component of a corporate social responsibility initiative, the market opportunities and regulatory forces that impact its development, the role of top management in encouraging SNPD, stages in the process of SNPD, utilization of cross-functional teams in SNPD, the role of the environmental specialist in these teams, and other related topics of emerging importance to academics and practitioners.

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Adam Lindgreen, C. Anthony Di Benedetto and Florian Kock

Despite evidence of meticulous business-to business marketing research efforts, and the pleas of editors for truly original, ground-breaking research, there is still a shortage of original, courageous research ideas. To provide guidance to researchers and address this problem, we apply the OBC model (observe the world, bridge disciplines, and challenge assumptions and theories). We discuss the three main and four blended strategies recommended by this model, and illustrate each of these strategies with examples drawn from the marketing literature. Our application of the OBC model offers actionable guidelines for generating original research ideas, as well as theoretical grounding for each element of the model. Given the publication pressure felt by young academic researchers, we hope that our discussion provides encouragement and guidance, which will result in original, courageous business-to-business marketing research.

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Adam Lindgreen, C. Anthony Di Benedetto and Michael B. Beverland

Business-to-business marketing academics study complex phenomena, aiming to describe these phenomena through theoretical frameworks, explaining the relationships among the framework’s constructs, and provide guidance and insight to decision-makers. Not surprisingly, often business-to-business researchers undertake qualitative case studies. In this chapter, we discuss what we believe could be reported in the write-up of a case-study methodology section. In particular, we consider the issues of selecting cases; crafting instruments and protocols, entering the field; and analyzing the data. How to assess the validity and reliability of qualitative case studies is also discussed. We finish the chapter by examining three exemplar case studies that have been published in Industrial Marketing Management.

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Adam Lindgreen, C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Joëlle Vanhamme and John Nicholson

The idea for this book can be traced back to the editor’s desk at Industrial Marketing Management. The first two authors are the co-Editors-in-Chief of this journal, and they set out to write a series of short editorials aimed at providing guidance on writing and revising research manuscripts to the earlyor mid career business-to-business marketing academic. Working with Peter LaPlaca (former long-time editor of Industrial Marketing Management) and some of the leading authors appearing in that journal, a couple of editorials on successfully writing and revising articles appeared in the pages of Industrial Marketing Management in 2018. As the idea grew, it was clear that there were many other academic career challenges to be faced, as well as many opportunities specific to the business-to-business marketing scholar, and very few resources available for specific guidance or insight.

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Adam Lindgreen, C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Roderick J. Brodie and Peter Naudé

Business school leaders would like to attract and keep the top research talent in order to stay competitive, attract high-potential students, and recruit the most promising young faculty. To accomplish these objectives, a successful research environment for its business academic researchers needs to be established, so that they can produce a sustainable research stream. We examine important antecedents including business school research strategy, leadership, governance, and policy, and from these we develop a set of conditions that are related to long-term success of research programs in academic business institution. As detailed illustrations, we elaborate the experiences of two active research institutions - the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group and the Contemporary Marketing Practices (CMP) Group - and discuss how each of these groups has implemented the conditions for success. We conclude with general observations on the environmental conditions most conducive to sustainable business school research, and present implications regarding the role of the journal editor as a gatekeeper.

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Adam Lindgreen, C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Roderick J. Brodie and Michel van der Borgh

As an applied social science, business-to-business research is inherently cross-disciplinary. The general theories that provide insight into business relationships, systems, and markets have disciplinary foundations in the economics, psychology, sociology, and management disciplines. When conducting cross-disciplinary research, academic researchers, like their counterparts in industry, must overcome functional silos. Depending on the type of research challenge, a multi-disciplinary approach may be required; however, differences in incentives, culture, terminology and jargon, and so forth all can lead to opportunistic and counterproductive behavior. The purpose of this chapter is to explore how to undertake cross-disciplinary research that advances knowledge and understanding in the domain of business-to-business research. To achieve this purpose, we elaborate on the theorizing processes; we examine how to break cross-disciplinary boundaries; and we provide practical guidelines for undertaking cross-disciplinary research.

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C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Adam Lindgreen, Marianne Storgaard and Ann Højbjerg Clarke

We offer a meta-perspective on the collaboration between university academics and business practitioners. While academics often intuitively and implicitly take an inside perspective, namely a university perspective, in discussing collaborative research and the why, how, and what in collaborating with practitioners, we bring to the fore an outside perspective, namely a business perspective, on the same collaboration, which then typically is termed collaborative innovation. Doing this gives us the opportunity to mirror the two perspectives against each other and to discuss the differences, difficulties, and learning opportunities in the relationship between universities and businesses. Ultimately, we offer a discussion of how academics can be inspired to engage better with practitioners.

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Adam Lindgreen, C. Anthony Di Benedetto, Roderick J. Brodie and Peter Naudé

At any leading business school, one of the most important goals is to foster an environment of successful academic research. This is especially true at research-intensive business schools where a core of solid, productive researchers leads to recognition and ranking among the top business schools. We examine how business schools contribute to education by translating their great research into great teaching for graduate business-to-business marketing classes (including MBA programs with such classes). First, we present some of the most recent findings on teaching excellence, which pertains to business instructors, as well as to academics in general. Next, we explore the specific opportunities and responsibilities facing the business-to-business marketing academic. We then discuss the process by which business-to-business marketing academics can transform our research in meaningful ways and deliver value to our practitioner audience in the classroom.