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Zhiming Cheng, Ingrid Nielsen and Russell Smyth

This study has three purposes. The first is to examine the determinants of wage arrears among rural–urban migrants in China. The second is to examine the effect of wage arrears on economic wellbeing as proxied by wages. The third is to examine how experiencing wage arrears affects several subjective indicators of wellbeing, such as feelings of belongingness and discrimination in the city. To examine the determinants of wage arrears and its implications for socio-economic wellbeing, we employ pooled data from a unique representative dataset collected in Guangdong province, one of the major destinations for migrants in China, for the years 2006, 2008 and 2009. We find that in 2006 9 per cent of the sample reported wage arrears and that this figure fell to 6 per cent in 2008 and 7 per cent in 2009. Males were more likely to experience wage arrears as were those working for private firms and micro-entrepreneurs, relative to those working for government agencies. Those with a labour contract, those who were a member of a trade union and those who had a trade union in the workplace were less likely to experience wage arrears. Those experiencing wage arrears received 3.8 per cent higher monthly wages, were 11.4 per cent more likely to perceive that life was difficult in the city, were 6.8 per cent more likely to perceive that their status was lower than others in the city and were 5.6 per cent more likely to believe life would be easier with a non-agricultural household registration.
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Huey-Kuo Chen, Hsiao-Chi Peng and Cheng-Yi Chou

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Edited by Roger Sugden, Rita Hartung Cheng and G. Richard Meadows

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Edited by Roger Sugden, Rita Hartung Cheng and G. Richard Meadows

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Edited by Roger Sugden, Rita Hartung Cheng and G. Richard Meadows

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Edited by Roger Sugden, Rita Hartung Cheng and G. Richard Meadows

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Edited by Roger Sugden, Rita Hartung Cheng and G. Richard Meadows

There is currently a popular view that the world is undergoing profound changes in the fundamental relationships upon which it is organised. In particular, there is widespread talk of a ‘globalised’ economy, facilitated by and associated with ‘new’ technologies and practices. There is a further consensus that within this ‘globalised’, ‘new’ economy, regionalisation in some form is important. The aim of this volume is to address these topical issues, presenting perspectives from which they can be analysed and exploring specific aspects in greater detail. The contributors provide a framework for understanding current trends, and suggest approaches that highlight appropriate ways forward in the context of both opportunities and dangers. In doing so, they discuss specific cases and explore detailed policy possibilities, including the prospect of stimulating change through multinational engagement and debate.
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Junbo Yu, Shaoming Cheng and Roger R. Stough

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Jeremy C.Y. Cheng, Florence H.C. Ho and Kevin Au