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Christopher May

This chapter makes a simple argument: given the manner in which global corporations work with their global supply and/or value chains, an approach that merely understands this as the management of a complex set of relationships misses something important about their characteristic political economy. The chapter sets out an alternative approach that suggests there is some utility to understanding corporations as having a governance function across their networks, and links that suggestion to existing accounts of global governance. The author suggests that issues of legitimate authority and even a form of democratic deficit will illuminate corporate practices more thoroughly than approaches that just look at supply chain management as a product of efficiency maximization. The chapter therefore argues that global corporations can be usefully regarded for analytical purposes as institutions of global governance themselves.

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Christopher May

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Christopher May

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Christopher May

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Christopher May

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Christopher May

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Christopher May

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The Rule of Law

The Common Sense of Global Politics

Christopher May

This timely book explores the complexities of the rule of law – a well-used but perhaps less well understood term - to explain why it is so often appealed to in discussions of global politics. Ranging from capacity building and the role of the World Bank to the discourse(s) of lawyers and jurisprudential critiques, it seeks to introduce non-lawyers to the important and complex political economy of the rule of law.
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Christopher May

This chapter examines the (perhaps) least discussed notion of the trio of norms that sit at the heart of the rule of law: neutrality; uniformity; and predictability. While much is said about neutrality and uniformity, less is said about the requirement for predictability. Thus, in this chapter first, predictability is presented as a way of thinking further about the rule of law’s appeal as a political norm, but secondly, also as a way of exploring the rule of law’s most basic character. This element of the norm of the rule of law, when identified as lacking can immediately falsify the claim that the governance system under discussion should be regarded as exhibiting the rule of law. This chapter therefore examines the value of predictability, both through the lens of economic development and more widely through the manner in which we govern ourselves and our expectations about our social, and private, lives. This leads to the conclusion that any system of social governance that is unable to provide a sustained level of predictability about social action and practice would be unable to substantiate a claim to be a system where the rule of law obtains, whatever its other merits.