You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items

  • Author or Editor: Claudia De Fuentes x
Clear All Modify Search
You do not have access to this content

Jahan Ara Peerally and Claudia De Fuentes

We propose that the innovation systems approach advanced by innovation studies scholars – as opposed to the innovation ecosystem approach advanced by social entrepreneurship/strategy scholars – has the most merit when examining innovative capability building by latecomer social enterprises (LCSEs). The former approach was designed primarily for latecomer – less developed, developing and emerging – countries, and extensively addresses systemic failures for learning and knowledge building in enterprises. In this conceptual chapter, we describe the characteristics of LCSEs and we depict the actors and systemic failures for building knowledge and innovative capabilities within their innovation systems. We present a typology of LCSEs based on ownership structure, which serves to better frame LCSEs for future studies on their knowledge sources and innovation systems. In this process, we unveil that the literature has not yet fully understood the elusive developing or emerging country – latecomer – multinational social enterprises nexus, which generates critical research avenues.

You do not have access to this content

Valeria Arza, Claudia De Fuentes, Gabriela Dutrénit and Claudia Vazquez

You do not have access to this content

Cristina Chaminade, Claudia De Fuentes, Gouya Harirchi and Monica Plechero

The chapter discusses the spatial aspects of the increased globalization of innovation, analysing both the region’s role in influencing the propensity of actors to engage and to play different roles in global innovation networks (GINs). Until now, different concepts such as global value chain (GVC), global production network (GPN) and GIN have been used to explain the increase globalization of innovation activities. The authors provide a critical overview of these concepts. The involvement of new actors (not just multinationals) from different locations (not just from developed economies) reveal the limitations of frameworks such as GVC and GPN in explaining the structure and dynamics of global networks. The chapter highlights how the concept of GIN, when properly addressed, can lead to a better understanding of the micro and meso dynamics of the new phenomena that arise from the globalization of innovation activities.

You do not have access to this content

Arturo Torres, Rosalba Casas, Claudia De Fuentes and Alexandre O. Vera-Cruz