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Claudio M. Radaelli

In this chapter Claudio Radaelli critically appraises the literature on Europeanization, reviewing a large number of empirical studies and their research design. The chapter discusses concept formation, the role of EU pressure and the agency of actors in processes of Europeanization, and the relationship between this field of research and interpretivism. Finally, the chapter looks at the future of research Europeanization in a context characterized by multiple crises and perhaps Europeanization in reverse.

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Edited by Claire A. Dunlop and Claudio M. Radaelli

This comparative Handbook provides a pioneering and comprehensive account of regulatory impact assessment – the main instrument used by governments and regulators to appraise the likely effects of their policy proposals. Renowned international scholars and practitioners describe the substance of impact assessment, situating it in its proper theoretical traditions and scrutinizing its usage across countries, policy sectors, and policy instruments. The Handbook of Regulatory Impact Assessment will undoubtedly be of great value to practitioners and also scholars with its wealth of detail and lessons to be learned.
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Edited by Claire A. Dunlop and Claudio M. Radaelli

This content is available to you

Edited by Claire A. Dunlop and Claudio M. Radaelli

This content is available to you

Claire A. Dunlop and Claudio M. Radaelli

This Edward Elgar Handbook of Regulatory Impact Assessment aims to provide a balanced account of what it is to design, make and implement impact assessment (IA) across a range of major policy sectors, countries and regions. In the volume, a field of international academic and practitioner experts guide us through the state of the art of IA in five parts: (1) the analytical approaches that underpin IA; (2) the pre-eminent tools, actors and dimensions; (3) major policy sectors where IA is featured; (4) the regional diffusion of IA; and (5) its implementation analytically, pedagogically and in the field. This introduction fulfils the function of a scene-setting chapter. The authors do not offer a systematic account of IA (assuming that is possible), nor is it a summary of the chapters that follow. Rather, they define what IA is and report on research on impact assessment informed by two disciplines, political science and economics. Specifically, they consider four domains: the theoretical justification of impact assessment, its diffusion across time and jurisdictions, the economic effects and the ways in which governments use this tool. In the conclusions section they reflect on the variability of form and substance.

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Claire A. Dunlop and Claudio M. Radaelli

One proposition put forward in this volume is that there is a relationship between policy instruments and mechanisms. To find out how exactly this relationship works, its activators and the causal role of policy instruments, the authors zoom in on the case of impact assessment (IA) in the European Union. IA is an evidence-based instrument adopted by the EU in the context of the evidence-based better regulation strategy. The connection between IA and learning is apparently intuitive: IA should bring evidence to bear on the process of selecting policy options, and therefore assist decision-makers in learning from different type of analysis, dialogue with experts and stakeholders, and open consultation. However, we find out that learning comes in different modes (epistemic, reflexive, bargaining and hierarchical) and that the activators, context and results of learning vary across modes. In the conclusions, we reflect on the connections between learning and politics revealed by our approach to policy instruments and varieties of learning.

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Claire A. Dunlop and Claudio M. Radaelli

Does regulation cause corruption? In a field dominated by economics, the public administration literature has opened the peripheral view of social scientists by bringing evidence to bear on three different claims: that regulation causes corruption but under certain conditions; that it is the quality of regulation to hinder corruption; and, that anti-corruption regulation can aggravate the problem of corruption. After having reviewed and discussed the claims, we turn to recent advances in the literature and make suggestions for future research. We make the case for drawing more attention to regulatory policy instruments and point to the crucial stage of rule-making. Next, we introduce novel ways to model causality and identify how regulation may explain corruption, contrasting the statistical worldview with set-theoretic explanations. Finally, we critically discuss the state of play with measures of corruption and how to improve.

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Fabrizio De Francesco and Claudio M. Radaelli