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Colin Hughes

Gaining access to respondents can be a significant challenge and a source of frustration for many researchers. When seeking access, researchers often waste time speaking to non-decision makers and fail to sell the value of their research. This short vignette highlights the importance of sales skills for researchers.

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Colin Hughes

Doctoral research requires intensive effort and is a journey often fraught with bouts of uncertainty and self-doubt. Additionally, time management is a common challenge. This chapter traces the author’s journey towards effective time management. It begins with a short discussion of his work–study–life balance, to set the scene. Next, it outlines a few reflections on time management and on the changes made by the author to overcome a heavy workload and to prioritise the things most important to him. Throughout the chapter, there are suggestions for effective time management, addressing failure to prioritise tasks, being afraid to say ‘No’ or ‘Not right now’ and experiencing a lack of focus. The chapter concludes with five lessons for keeping the doctorate on track, including setting goals, blocking out weekly time slots for study, and agreeing monthly deadlines and a monthly work plan with supervisors.

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Neve Isaeva, Colin Hughes and Mark N.K. Saunders

The authors commence by defining the nature of trust, discussing its antecedents and providing an overview of both psychological and sociological perspectives. Next, they consider the theory of trust development and the variety of different trust relationships within the organizational context. They then highlight the relevance and utility of trust in organizational contexts. In particular, they emphasize the significance of trust to the management of people at work, considering the benefits of trust to HRM and its role as a lubricant. The authors conclude by discussing areas where knowledge is more limited, particularly in relation to virtual teams and distrust, outlining opportunities for further development of theory and arguing for a more epistemologically pluralist future.